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Predicting and Confirming with City Green by Jessica Boydston

Lesson Overview

Title

Predicting and Confirming: City Green

Focus  of Lesson (a phrase or sentence)

Learning to make predictions about a text and confirm whether the prediction was correct or not.

Objectives

·         During a read aloud of City Green, third grade students will apply the strategy of predicting and confirming by orally stating at least two predictions, in complete sentences, under the column labeled “predicting” on a T-chart.

·         Following the read aloud of City Green, third grade students will apply the confirming part of the strategy by verifying whether their predictions were correct or not, and writing them in complete sentence in the column labeled “confirming” on the T-chart.

·         Following the read aloud of City Green, third grade students will be able to accurately name and define the comprehension strategy of predicting and confirming, explaining verbally at least two of the following that apply: the purpose of the strategy, when it is used, why it is useful, and how to use it while reading on their own.

·         During independent reading time, third grades students will make a series of at least five predictions in complete written sentences, of what they think will happen next, before and during their reading of the story, on a provided T-chart along with corresponding five confirmations of those predictions.

Rationale for learning

Predicting and confirming allows students to think reflectively about what the book or text might be about and helps the reader ask questions that will guide the reading process. Predicting and confirming is one of the most important strategies because it helps the reader comprehend text.

Student Assessment

In order to assess the learning of the students, they will be tasked with reading a book during independent reading, and creating a series of at least five predictions in complete written sentences, of what they think will happen next, before and during their reading of the story. These sentences will be written on a provided T-chart under the column, labeled “predictions.” After reading the story, the students will write what actually happened in the column labeled “confirming,” next to each corresponding prediction. This will determine whether the students understand how to use the comprehension strategy of predicting and confirming.

In order to pass, the students must have at least five predictions and confirmations, and each must be listed in complete sentences.

Materials and Resources Required for Lesson

Books (include author, title, and approximate readability level)

Print materials (please include all copies of handouts or student materials at the end of the lesson plan):

 

Supplies:

City Green by: DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan

Poster explaining the comprehension strategy

T-charts for student assessment and independent practice

 Activities and TEKS

Language Arts:

·         (2) Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:

(A)  use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing

clues) to make and confirm predictions;

  • 29)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)    listen attentively to speakers, ask relevant questions, and make pertinent

      comments;

  • (31)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in teacher- and student-led discussions by posing and answering questions with appropriate detail and by providing suggestions that build upon the ideas of others.

 

Introduction to the Lesson

Focus: I want to see a show of hands of how many of you have ever gone to the library and looked at the cover of a book to decide whether or not you want to read it? I see quite a few hands. By looking at the picture on the cover of the book, you are predicting what the book might be about, and deciding whether or not it is something that might interest you. Today we are going to read the book, City Green, by DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan, and use a comprehension strategy called predicting and confirming, while reading it.

Purpose: Predicting and confirming is a strategy that will help you become a better reader, because it helps you comprehend and understand what you are reading.

 

Instruction: “I do, we do, you do”

  1. I Do

Begin the lesson by explaining that we are going to use a T-chart to write down our predictions in one column, and when we realize whether the prediction was true or false, we will write down what actually happened in the confirming column.

 

Begin talking about the cover of the book, City Green. Explain, again, that you can make predictions about what the book might be about by looking at the cover of the book and reading the title. Share with them your prediction of what the book is going to be about and write the prediction on the T-chart.

 

Predicting: I’m thinking this story might be about a little girl who plants a garden in her city, maybe in an area where there aren’t a lot of gardens. I made this prediction from the title of the book, and by looking at the picture on the cover of the book.

 

Begin reading the book, and stop to make predictions about what will happen next or throughout the story. Each time you make a prediction, write down the prediction on the predicting side of the T-chart, and when you come across a confirmation, write it down on the confirming side.

 

  • Page 1: Predicting: I’m thinking that maybe the building caught on fire and burnt down, maybe that’s why Old Man Hammer is so mean about it.

 

  • Page 2: Confirming: What did we find out about the building? Did it burn down? No, it was torn down by a crane and a wrecking ball.

 

  • Page 3: Predicting: I’m thinking that maybe Miss Rosa and the little girl are going to plant a garden where that old building used to be.

 

  • Page 9: Predicting: I think that Miss Rosa and the little girl are going to have plenty of names on their petition, and that they will be able to rent the lot. I also think that Old Man Hammer may give them a hard time about using the lot because he’s so bitter about the building being torn down.

 

  • Page 10: Confirming: Did Miss Rosa and the little girl plant a garden where the old building used to be like I predicted? Yes, they did.

 

·         Page 10: Confirming: Miss Rosa and Marcy had a lot of names on their petition and were able to use the lot to plant their garden.

 

  • Page 12: Predicting: I’m thinking that Old Man Hammer will eventually decide that he wants to help the little girl and the rest of the city in making a garden.

 

  • Page 17: Predicting: From looking at the picture, I’m thinking they are going to build a fence around the garden and paint the fence with the bright colored paint Mr. Rocco brings.

 

  1. We Do:

      Now that I have shown you how to use this strategy, and have given you some ideas of my predictions, I want you to try and predict some things that you think might happen and help me confirm whether my predictions were true or false. 

      I am going to continue reading, and after each page, I will call on a student to tell me a prediction they have about what will happen next, or tell me whether one of our predictions has already been confirmed. The student I call on will write either the prediction or confirmation on our T-chart.

     Teacher will read each page and stop, throughout the rest of the book, calling on students to make predictions or confirmations.

 

  1. You Do (Independent practice)

“Today we learned a new strategy called “predicting and confirming.” I showed you how to use this strategy and told you why it was important, we practiced the strategy together, and now I want you to try it on your own. I want each of you to choose a book that you have not yet read, from our classroom library, and find a place around the room, it can either be at your desk or place on the floor. I will give each of you a T-chart, in which you will write at least five predictions about what you think will happen in the story. You will also confirm whether your prediction was true or false, or state whether it wasn’t mentioned at all in the story. Make sure your predictions and confirmations are written in complete sentences. This is independent work, so please do not speak to anybody else in the room about your predictions and confirmations, you will have a chance to share later.” 

 

Differentiation Options (modify by content, process, and/or final product)

 

 

Students with challenges in literacy

1. Have the student sit near another student that can help him/her.

2. Give the student extra practice.

3. Give the student extra time if needed.

 

English Language Learners (ELL)

1. Help these students write their sentences.

2. Repeat things several times for them.

3. Provide extra help and more time if needed.

Early finishers and/or students who need enrichment

1. They may help other students.

2. They may work on other assignments.

3. Read silently and independently.

 

References and Internet Resources 

 

Literacy for Children in An Information Age: Teaching Reading, Writing, and Thinking by: Vicki L. Cohen and John E. Cohen p193:http://books.google.com/books?id=ACw-o5v9w0EC&pg=PA193&lpg=PA193&dq=why+is+predicting+and+confirming+important+for+students&source=bl&ots=4y6-kzeOi-&sig=YcUMMT-Bo9_Og7vNckusy0MgdBU&hl=en&ei=-ACYS-yrOoTKMPulwXo&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CBIQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=why%20is%20predicting%20and%20confirming%20important%20for%20students&f=false

 

Miller, Debbie. (2002). Reading with meaning. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse Pub.

 

 

 

Predicting and Confirming

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 When you use it: When you want to think reflectively about what the book or text might be about and helps the reader ask questions that will guide the reading process.

Why you use it: To help you ask questions that will guide the reading process and to help you comprehend the text you read.

How you use it: Predict what will happen next, before and during the reading of a story, and confirm whether the prediction was correct or not.

 

“I’m thinking this story might be about…”

 

 

 

“From looking at the picture, I’m thinking…”

“I predict that….will happen next.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehension Strategy Assessment

Name: _____________________

 

Fill in the T-chart with at least 5 predictions and 5 confirmations, written in complete sentences. Then answer the questions at the bottom.

 

 

                     Predictions                                             Confirmations

 

1.                                                                                                                                                        1.

 

 

 

 

2.                                                                                                                                                         2.

 

 

 

 

3.                                                                                                                                                        3.

 

 

What is the name of this strategy? ________________________________

 

Why is it important to use this strategy? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Text Box: Rubric
3- Student wrote a combination of 8-10 predictions and confirmations in complete sentences and answered the two questions at the bottom with accurate answers.
2- Student wrote 5-7 predictions and confirmations, in complete sentences and answered at least one of the two questions at the bottom with an accurate answer.
1-Student wrote less than 5 predictions and confirmations and did not seem to get the gist of the strategy.