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The Department of Modern Languages

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The Department of Modern Languages



230 Hammond Hall · Box 19557 · 817-272-3161
langlab.uta.edu


Overview

The Department of Modern Languages (MODL) offers courses in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.

MODL offers a Bachelor of Arts in French, Spanish, and a Bachelor of Arts with major in Critical Languages and International Studies (Chinese, German, and Russian), as well as certificate programs in Translation (Spanish) and Localization and Translation (Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Korean, Portuguese, and Russian). At the graduate level, MODL offers a Master of Arts in Modern Languages with concentrations in French or Spanish. The department also offers minors in Arabic, Chinese, French, Korean,German, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish, as well as area studies and other options.

Learning other languages has always formed a critical part of a well-rounded education. In today's global economy, the ability to communicate in languages other than one's own has become an increasingly valuable asset sought after by employers across the public and private sectors. Our substantive programs prepare students for research, translation, literary studies, linguistic studies, teaching, and business.

The goal of language study is to develop deep translingual and transcultural competence. In view of these aims, MODL provides a full range of language offerings from beginning to advanced courses in a variety of languages from around the globe. In addition to development in the four basic language skills -- speaking, listening, reading, and writing -- a major aim is to gain understanding of the diversity of human culture as represented in several of the world's languages, literatures, and other cultural media.

Ultimately, these aims contribute to the development of informed and capable communication and interaction with educated native speakers of the target language as well as the ability to reflect on the world and oneself through the lens of other languages and cultures.



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Criteria for Admission to a Major in the Department of Modern Languages

In addition to satisfying the entrance requirements for the College of Liberal Arts, prospective majors in the Department of Modern Languages must meet the following criteria:

  • A 3.0 GPA is required in the 1441-2314 Modern Language sequence, or a grade of B on the Modern Language placement test, or approval of the departmental advisor.
  • After admission to the Modern Language major, students must maintain a 2.75 GPA in major classes.


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Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in French, Spanish, and Critical Languages & International Studies

English

Six hours of composition.

Literature

Three hours of English or modern and classical languages literature or other approved substitute.

Liberal Arts Elective

Three hours above the freshman level of literature, or social and cultural studies designated as taught in the College of Liberal Arts, or fine arts or philosophy, or technical writing.

Political Science

2311, 2312.

History

1311, 1312.

Mathematics

Six hours (MATH 1301 or higher).

Science

Eight hours in lab science (biology, chemistry, geology and/or physics).

Fine Arts

Three hours from architecture, art, dance, music, or theatre arts.

Social/Cultural Studies

Three hours. The Social and Cultural Studies requirement will be satisfied by designated courses which have been approved by the Undergraduate Assembly. For a list of approved courses, contact the University Advising Center or the departmental advisor.

Electives

Sufficient number of hours to complete the total hours required for a degree.

Major

1441, 1442, 2313, 2314, or equivalent; plus 24 hours at 3000/4000 level in the major language field, at least nine of which must be at the 4000 level. Of these 24 hours, specific course requirements by language are listed below:

French - FREN 3311, 3312, 3303

Critical Languages & International Studies - GLOBAL 2301 as well as 12 advanced hours in the chosen language and 12 hours in global studies from one of the 3 categories: Arts and Humanities (Art, History, Literature, Music), Global Issues (Business, Ethics, Sustainability), Social and Cultural Studies (Anthropology, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology). See advisor for a complete listing of relevant courses.

Spanish - SPAN 3314, 3315, 3319 (Native or heritage speakers must take SPAN 3305, 3315, 3319).

Native or heritage speakers of a language may not enroll in courses below 3000, with the exception of SPAN 2315.

Minor

19 hours (excluding 1441), at least 9 of which must be 3000/4000 level. For a minor in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish, see below.

Electives

Sufficient to reach the total of hours required for the degree.

Total

120 hours, at least 36 of which must be 3000/4000 level.



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Requirements for a Minor in Chinese, French, German, Russian, or Spanish

A minor consists of 19 semester hours (excluding 1441), at least nine of which must be 3000/4000 level.



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Bachelor of Arts in Critical Languages and International Studies

All students who wish to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree in Critical Languages and International Studies must complete the following coursework in language and allied fields: Chinese, German, or Russian 1441, 1442, 2313, 2314 and GLOBAL 2301. In addition, 12 advanced hours are required in the chosen language, as well as 12 advanced hours in global studies chosen from one of 3 categories: Arts and Humanities (Art, History, Literature, Music), Global Issues (Business, Ethics, Sustainability), Social and Cultural Studies (Anthropology, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology). See advisor for a complete listing of relevant courses in these 3 categories. Courses listed under Options do not substitute for courses specified by number in the basic degree plan above.



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Critical Cultures Summer Institute

The Critical Cultures Summer Institute (CCSI) highlights a different, less commonly taught cultural area of the globe each summer, providing up to 9 credits of upper-division coursework, along with GLOBAL 2301, the anchor course of UTA's Critical Languages and International Studies (CLIS) major.

GLOBAL 2301 will provide an introduction to global studies and couple with GLOBAL 3301 and 3302 in such areas as language and civilization, film, media, or other subjects of global study. An introductory class in Localization and Translation will also be offered under the aegis of the Summer Institute as GLOBAL 3310. GLOBAL 3301, 3302, and 3310 will fulfill three of the four international studies courses required for the BA in Critical Languages and Global Studies. GLOBAL 2301 is also a requirement for the degree. GLOBAL 2301 and GLOBAL 3301 will be offered during Summer Session I, and GLOBAL 3302 and 3310 will be offered during Summer Session II. Students at any level of language study may take these courses.

Teacher Certification

Students wishing to take a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Modern Language with Secondary Teacher Certification must complete 24 hours of courses in the language, at the 2000 level and above. Eighteen of these hours must be at the 3000 or 4000 level. In addition, each language requires specific courses (counted toward the overall requirement):

French: FREN 3303, 4339 Spanish: SPAN 3314*, 4339

*Native or heritage Spanish speakers must take SPAN 3305 in place of SPAN 3314.

Students should consult the College of Education for information concerning Teacher Certification and other specific requirements.

Latin American Studies

(Bachelor of Arts Degree in Spanish with a concentration in Latin American studies)

Political Science 3316.

History 4365, 4366, 4367.

Economics 4321, 4322 (recommended).

Major: Spanish.

Medieval and Early Modern Studies Minor

The Medieval and Early Modern Studies minor fosters interdisciplinary study of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Era, encouraging students to explore and connect topics in language, literature, history, art, and philosophy. Students seeking to minor in Medieval and Early Modern Studies should first consult with advisors in their departments or programs for approval of the minor, then with the Director of the Minor in Medieval and Early Modern Studies. The minor consists of six courses (18 hours total; six hours upper level) selected from courses in Art History, English, History, Modern Languages (French, German, and Spanish), and Philosophy. No more than nine hours to be completed within any single discipline. Students should consult the catalog or visit http://www.uta.edu/libarts/mems/index.html for more information.

Intensive Language Program

Students with no previous experience or courses in a modern language may choose to begin French, German, Spanish, or Russian by enrolling in the Intensive Program, and may complete Levels I and II (8 credit hours), or Levels III and IV (6 credit hours) of the chosen language in the Fall, Spring, or Summer sessions. Students may also choose to fulfill their language requirement by enrolling in Arabic, Chinese, and Portuguese. These classes may not be offered every semester or every summer. Check with the Department of Modern Languages for available courses. Students are cautioned to take these courses prior to their senior year because of the possibility of enrollment limitations.

BBA in International Business/Modern Language

In cooperation with the Department of Modern Languages, the School of Business Administration offers a Bachelor of Business Administration with dual concentrations in international business and a modern language. The BBA in International Business offers concentrations in French, German, Russian, or Spanish. In addition to 26 hours in a modern language with an additional six hours of modern language electives highly recommended, students in this program get a solid foundation in business courses, including accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and information systems. Students are encouraged to include six hours of degree specific language electives.

Certificate in Spanish Translation

Students interested in receiving theoretical and practical training in Spanish-English and English-Spanish translation are eligible to apply to the Department of Modern Languages for this

15-hour certificate program in translation, localization, computer-assisted translation, and translation theory. Topics to be covered by coursework in the Certificate Program include medical, business, technical, scientific, legal, and literary translation. To be admitted to the program, students must demonstrate writing proficiency in both Spanish and English. Students should also have completed SPAN 3305 (Spanish for Heritage Speakers) or SPAN 3314 (Advanced Spanish Grammar), and SPAN 3315 (Composition through Literature), or have consent of the department. Once in the program, students begin by taking SPAN 3340 (Introduction to Translation). After completing this class with a grade of B or better, students must take SPAN 4341 (Business and Legal Translation) and SPAN 4342 (Medical, Scientific and Technical Translation). SPAN 4341 and SPAN 4342 cannot be applied toward the B.A. in Spanish, but can be taken as Liberal Arts electives. To receive the certificate, students are also required to pass an Exit Examination in translation. In order to be eligible to take the Exit Examination, students must pass SPAN 4341 and SPAN 4342 with a grade of C or better. The Exit Examination in translation may only be taken once.

Certificate in Localization and Translation with options in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Dual-Language

In this five-course certificate program students study the processes of localization and develop specialized skills in translation for future employment in the language services industry. Localization adapts language, texts, products, software and websites to the locale for which they are intended. By using specialized computer-assisted translation workflow software and simulating a collaborative work environment, students become conversant with the tools and procedures required for twenty-first century localization and translation work. Extensive practice in translating a variety of oral and written documents in the target language provides the skills to work in business, non-profit, and academic situations. Three translation and localization courses and two culture courses comprise the certificate. Students in Chinese take a total of five courses as follows: CHIN 3310, 3311 twice, and 3303 and 3304. Students in French take FREN 3320, 3321 twice, one of the following 3000 level courses: 3310, 3311, 3312, 3316, 3318 and one of the following 4000 level courses: 4328, 4334, 4335, 4338. Students in German take a total of five courses as follows: GERM 3310 or 4334, 3311 twice or 3311 and 4335, and two additional upper level courses. Russian students take five courses: RUSS 3310 or 4334, 3311 twice or 3311 and 4335, 3333, and 4362. All courses can be used toward fulfilling the requirements for a major in French and a minor in German, or Russian. Students in Arabic, Korean, and Portuguese take five courses: ARAB/KORE/PORT 3310, 3311 twice, and two upper-division offerings in campus disciplines with an area studies focus related to the language and culture of study, where student course and project work is completed in agreement with a Modern Language instructor to show significant use of authentic, target-language readings and source materials. A minimum of two years (four semesters) is required for this program.

Dual-Language Certificate in Localization and Translation with options in Chinese-French/German/Russian, French-German/Russian, German-Russian

In this eight-course certificate program students study the processes of localization and develop specialized skills in translation in two languages. One beginning course (CHIN 3310/GERM 3310 or 4334 /FREN 3320/RUSS 3310 or 4334) and one advanced course (CHIN 3311/GERM 3311 or 4335/FREN 3321/RUSS 3311 or 4335) in localization and translation are required in each language. Four additional culture courses (two in each language) are also required: For Chinese, CHIN 3303 and 3304, for French one of the following 3000 level courses: FREN 3312, 3316, 3318 and one of the following 4000 level courses: FREN 4328, 4334, 4335, 4338; for German two 3000 or 4000 level courses; for Russian RUSS 3333 and 4362. A minimum of two years (four semesters) is required for this program. For more information see the localization and translation advisor in Chinese, French, German, or Russian.



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Language Acquisition Center

The Department of Modern Languages maintains a fully equipped audio, video, and computerized language laboratory on the third floor of Trimble Hall. CDs, DVDs, audio tapes, video tapes, computerized language software, organized additional instruction, and tutoring are used as supplemental modes of assistance in the language acquisition process.



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Credit by Examination and Placement Tests

Spanish, French, and German. Students with one year of background in the language they will study are strongly recommended to take an advanced placement examination for placement at the appropriate level. Students wishing to earn credit by examination for any of the first four (1441, 1442, 2313, 2314) levels of French, German, or Spanish must present an official score received on one of two nationally administered examinations recognized by the department: (1) Advanced Placement Examination of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB), or (2) College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the CEEB. At UT Arlington the examinations will be administered by the Testing Services Office of Counseling and Career Development on dates to be announced. Native or heritage speakers in the French, German, or Spanish program must take either the CLEP or the CEEB exam, as described above.

Russian. Non-native speakers of Russian with previous exposure to the language, who intend to enroll in Russian courses at UT Arlington, may be eligible to take a placement test at the discretion of the department. Native or heritage speakers intending to major or minor in Russian must take the Russian placement test.

Arabic, Chinese, Korean, and Portuguese. Non-native speakers of Arabic, Chinese, Korean, or Portuguese with previous exposure to the language, who intend to enroll in courses in these languages at UT Arlington, may be eligible to take a placement test at the discretion of the department.

Placement tests for Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, and Russian are administered on site in the Department of Modern Languages and not offered by The Testing Services Office. For more information, contact the Department of Modern Languages. Testing fees may apply.



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Study Abroad

Students should give serious consideration to the unique learning experience of studying abroad. Students wishing to study for a summer, a semester, or a year may obtain UT Arlington credit, continue with their financial aid, and receive scholarship aid to attend any UT Arlington-approved program for Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish.

Summer Study: The department offers several opportunities for gaining credit while studying abroad. Regular programs are offered which provide opportunities for summer study in various countries, including France, Mexico, Spain, and Russia. All arrangements must be made through the department.



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Competence in Computer Use

Students majoring in French, Spanish, or Critical Languages and International Studies may demonstrate competency in computer use by:

  • passing CSE 1301 (or equivalent); or
  • passing any 1441, 1442, 2313 or 2314 FREN, GERM, RUSS or SPAN course(s) in residence at UT Arlington; or
  • passing the University computer competency examination; or
  • passing any other course approved by the Undergraduate Assembly for this purpose.


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Competence in Oral Presentations

Students majoring in French, Spanish, or Critical Languages and International Studies may demonstrate competence in oral presentations by:

  • taking and passing ARAB 3303, CHIN 3303, FREN 3303, GERM 3313, KORE 3303, RUSS 3333, SPAN 3303, SPAN 3304; or
  • passing COMS 1301, 1302 or 2305 (or equivalent); or
  • passing any other course approved by the Undergraduate Assembly for this purpose.


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Modern Languages Faculty

Chair

Associate Professor Sol

Associate Professors

Choi, Conway, Elliott, Israel-Pelletier, Kania, Rings, Rueda-Acedo, Ruiz-P�rez, van Noort

Assistant Professors

Austin, Harrison, Stewart, Watson

Professors Emeritus

Acker, Keilstrup, Ordóñez, Sánchez, Steinecke, Studerus, Viña



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Course Descriptions

Each modern language--Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish--has course designations 1441, 1442, etc. The student should check the language desired for the course description.

Native or heritage speakers may not enroll in courses numbered below 3000.

Information on Advanced Courses: Prerequisites for study at the advanced level (3000 and above) in FREN, GERM, RUSS, and SPAN are indicated in the course descriptions.

View Course Descriptions for:

Modern Language (MODL)

French (FREN)

Chinese (CHIN)

Arabic (ARAB)

German (GERM)

Portuguese (PORT)

Russian (RUSS)

Spanish (SPAN)



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