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Course Catalog

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Course List


HIST 1311 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865 (3-0) An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States prior to 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical skills. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1301.

HIST 1312 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1865 TO PRESENT (3-0) An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical skills. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1301.

HIST 2301 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION (3-0) (HIST 2311). Significant developments from prehistoric times through the 16th century. Achievements and experiences of great civilizations, emphasizing major historical figures and epochs, important ideas and religions, and factors of continuity and change. Provides a foundation for understanding our heritage and shared values, and introduces students to the historical forces that have shaped today's world.

HIST 2302 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION (3-0) (HIST 2312). Major modern trends such as industrialism, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the present century. Particular attention to the emergence of a global civilization. Provides a foundation for understanding our heritage and shared values, and introduces students to the historical forces that have shaped today's world.

HIST 2311 AMER HISTORY (0-0)

HIST 2313 HISTORY OF ENGLAND (3-0) The history of Britain from prehistoric times to 1688. The development of English laws and institutions. Required of all pre-law majors.

HIST 2314 HISTORY OF ENGLAND (3-0) British history from 1688 to the present. The growth of English laws and institutions. Required of all pre-law majors. HIST 2313 is not a prerequisite for this course.

HIST 3300 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH (3-0) Introduction to the methods that historians use to conduct research and present their findings in written and oral form. Required for history majors.

HIST 3307 HISTORY OF DISABILITY (3-0) Examines the history of ideas about disability, the historical lives of people with disabilities, and the history of disability policy. The growth of asylums, the rise of the eugenics movement, a historical look at freak shows, the impact of industrialization on experiences of disability, the evolution of special education, the role of ideas about disability in colonialism, the historical treatment of disabled veterans, and the development of the disability rights movement. Geographic focus will vary. Prerequisites: HIST 1311 and HIST 1312.

HIST 3309 WOMEN AND WORK, 1600 TO THE PRESENT (3-0) Examines the history of women and work, both waged and nonwaged, in Europe and the Americas, including the United States. Highlights differences within women's work cultures as well as variation in women's employment opportunities and their efforts to achieve equality with men in the workplace, by ethnicity, region, and nation. Offered as HIST 3309 and WOMS 3309; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3310 U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY TO 1860 (3-0) Women in politics, work and society from the colonial era to the Civil War. Women's efforts to reform society, including the abolition of slavery and acquisition of suffrage. Offered as HIST 3310 and WOMS 3310; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3311 U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY 1860 TO PRESENT (3-0) American women in politics, work and society since 1860, focusing on race and class and women's struggles for rights and liberation. Offered as HIST 3311 and WOMS 3311; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3315 WORK AND LEISURE IN THE UNITED STATES (3-0) Examines changing ideas and practices of work and leisure from colonial America to post-industrial society. Discusses how work and leisure rights developed according to social lines of class, gender, and race, and examines the impact of shifts in capitalist, industrial and consumer economies on those rights.

HIST 3317 U.S. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY, COLONIAL TO 1877 (3-0) Traces the adaptation of laws to changing social and economic needs with emphasis on the interrelations of law, public opinion, the legal profession, judiciary, and the political process. Topics include the transatlantic origins of American law, slavery and indentured servitude, poor laws and dependency, family law and gender, developments in criminal and civil law, and the failure of Reconstruction.

HIST 3318 U.S. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY, 1877 TO PRESENT (3-0) Traces the adaptation of laws to changing social and economic needs with emphasis on the interrelations of law, public opinion, the legal profession, judiciary, and the political process. Topics include civil rights, disability and the law, education, abortion, the death penalty, healthcare and social welfare, gun rights, eugenics, family law, and the impact of personality on judicial decision-making.

HIST 3319 GREAT ANGLO-AMERICAN TRIALS (3-0) The historical development of criminal trial procedure in Britain and the United States: arrest and detention procedures; the roles of judge and jury; press coverage; political implications of celebrated and notorious cases.

HIST 3320 U.S. CIVIL LIBERTIES (3-0) The historical origins of individual liberties in the United States. Topics include Bill of Rights freedoms and histories of case law relating to speech, privacy and religion.

HIST 3321 COLONIAL AMERICA TO 1763 (3-0) The beginnings of colonization in North America; the development of colonies and their political, social, economic, and cultural aspects; and the international ramifications culminating in the Great War for the Empire and the Treaty of Paris in 1763.

HIST 3322 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION, 1763-1789 (3-0) The origins of the American Revolution, the transformation of American politics and society during the Revolutionary era, and the establishment of the new national government under the Constitution. Special topics include the development of law, civilian-military relations, slavery and race relations, and women's social experience.

HIST 3323 THE NEW NATION, 1789-1844 (3-0) The development of the national government, the party system, the market economy, and reform movements from Jefferson through Jackson. The birth of modern American society and personality, with special emphasis on changing views of man, community, and society.

HIST 3324 THE COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1820-1860 (3-0) Sectional conflict in the United States from the Missouri Compromise of 1820 to the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. Southern separatism, slavery as a political issue, the antislavery movement, the breakup of the national political system, and the failure of sectional compromise. Offered as AAST 3324 and HIST 3324; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 3325 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION, 1850-1876 (3-0) The background and causes of secession and the Civil War, the organization of the Confederate States of America, the progress of the war, and the attempts to solve the racial, social, political, and economic problems of the post-war period.

HIST 3326 THE OLD SOUTH, 1607-1863 (3-0) Colonial origins of plantation agriculture, slavery, economics, King Cotton, politics and secession. Other topics include slave cultures, religion, slave insurrections, plantation lifestyle, honor, dueling and southern belles.

HIST 3327 THE NEW SOUTH, 1863-PRESENT (3-0) From military defeat to Sun Belt growth. Topics include Reconstruction, segregation, migration of Southerners to the North and West, depressions, reforms, Civil Rights, Moral Majority, cultural expressions in literature and music. Offered as AAST 3327 and HIST 3327; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 3328 THE AGE OF INDUSTRY AND REFORM, 1876-1920 (3-0) Examines the emergence of the United States as an industrial and world power between Reconstruction and World War I. Investigates how corporate capitalism, labor conflicts, immigration, urbanization, racial tensions, and a diverse array of reform movements laid the foundation for a recognizably modern United States. Credit will not be given for both HIST 3328 and HIST 3330 unless those courses were taken in 2007 or earlier. Prerequisites: HIST 1311 and HIST 1312.

HIST 3334 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1920-1945 (3-0) The technological revolution of the 1920s, the Great Depression, and World War II.

HIST 3342 CONTEMPORARY AMERICA, 1945-PRESENT (3-0) Special topics: the origins of the Cold War, the problem of loyalty in a democratic nation, the Vietnam conflict, the Fair Deal and Great Society, the Civil Rights Movement, student unrest and the growth of the New Left, and the impact of Richard Nixon and subsequent presidents on American politics.

HIST 3344 HISTORY AND FILM (3-0) Using historically-themed films, this course explores the ways in which the dramatic design of film can contribute to an understanding of history.

HIST 3345 IMMIGRATION IN UNITED STATES HISTORY (3-0) Immigration to the United States from the arrival of European colonists to the present. An examination of different forms of migration--voluntary and involuntary, temporary and permanent, legal and illegal. Explores the similarities and differences between the experiences of various immigrant groups. Particular attention to the shifting definitions of race, ethnicity, and citizenship, and the impact of immigrants on society and politics in the United States. Prerequisites: HIST 1311 and HIST 1312.

HIST 3346 RADICALISM IN MODERN AMERICA (3-0) An examination of the various movements that sought to radically alter the political and economic structure of the United States in the decades since the Civil War. This course examines the development of and differences between revolutionary movements such as anarchism, socialism, communism, and the New Left. Particular attention is given to the circumstances that gave rise to radical movements, the goals of these movements, how they attempted to achieve their goals, and the impact that they had on American society. Prerequisites: HIST 1311 and HIST 1312.

HIST 3348 HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1775-1913 (3-0) American foreign relations from the Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Four topics will be explored in depth: the problems of the young republic in conducting foreign policy; the acquisition of continental empire; the rise of the United States to Great Power status: the acquisition and rule of overseas empire.

HIST 3349 HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1913- PRESENT (3-0) American diplomacy from the outbreak of World War I to the present. American entry into the two World Wars; the Vietnam quagmire; American relations with the Soviet Union, China, and the Middle East.

HIST 3350 READING THE LANDSCAPE (3-0) How historians and geographers identify and interpret clues in the landscape (such as place names, architecture, vegetation, transportation, field and street patterns) that reflect historical change and its social, economic, environmental and geographic consequences. Offered as GEOG 3350 and HIST 3350; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3351 HISTORY OF THE DALLAS-FORT WORTH METROPLEX (3-0) The growth and development of Dallas and Fort Worth from competitive 19th-century trade centers in a rural setting to cooperative high-tech cities in a rapidly urbanizing metroplex. Political, economic, cultural, and spatial changes of this area are explored within a national urban context.

HIST 3352 THE SOUTHWEST (3-0) A multicultural history of the southwestern United States from pre-Columbian times to the present. Cultural adaptation to environment; cultural contact and conflict; political, social, and economic change. Also listed as MAS 3352; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3354 RELIGION & AMERICAN CULTURE (3-0) A summary of American religious traditions and spirituality. Emphasis on the intersection of sacred and secular in shaping national development.

HIST 3355 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3-0) People and the natural environment from the colonial period to the present. Ecological change, conservation movements, and artistic and literary interpretations of landscape and nature. Listed as GEOG 3355 and HIST 3355; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3356 MILITARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3-0) U.S. military history from the colonial period to the present. The role of the military establishment in the nation, the historical evolution of its organization, and the basic strategic and tactical concepts which it has employed.

HIST 3357 THE EARLY FRONTIER (3-0) The clash of empires and the patterns of exploration and settlement from the Atlantic Coast to the Mississippi River. Indian-white relations and the development of cultural, social, and political life on the early frontier.

HIST 3358 THE LATER FRONTIER (3-0) American settlement west of the Mississippi River through the close of the frontier. Exploration, the fur trade, mining, the cattle industry, Indian relations, and the role of the West in U.S. foreign affairs.

HIST 3359 PRESIDENTIAL PERSONALITY (3-0) This course will examine in their historical contexts the dynamics of presidential behavior, personality and leadership. A select number of chief executives will be reviewed, whose backgrounds, careers, and management styles will enable students to understand the extent and limits of presidential power.

HIST 3360 TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN CULTURAL HISTORY (3-0) The development of mass culture in 20th century America. The rise and social effects of popular culture, especially radio, film, television, advertising, and popular music.

HIST 3361 THE UNITED STATES IN VIETNAM, 1945-1975 (3-0) American involvement in the Indochinese conflict; the causes, outcome, and consequences of the war.

HIST 3362 CITIES AND SUBURBS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY (3-0) Traces urban and suburban development from the colonial era to the present with special emphasis not only on the transformation of their physical appearance over time but on their changing meaning and significance in American history. Focuses on the economic base of urban and suburban expansion, as well as the social, political and cultural dynamics of metropolitan America.

HIST 3363 TEXAS TO 1850 (3-0) Multicultural heritage of Texas from pre-Colombian period to early statehood. Cultural contact; social, economic, and political change. Completion of either HIST 3363 or 3364 is recommended for those planning to teach in Texas schools. Also listed as MAS 3363; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3364 TEXAS SINCE 1845 (3-0) Texas in the Mexican-American and Civil Wars. Political events and ethnic relations since annexation. Rise of cotton, cattle, and oil industries. Literature and music in the 20th century. Completion of either HIST 3363 or 3364 is recommended for those planning to teach history in Texas secondary schools.

HIST 3365 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865 (3-0) History of blacks in America from their African origins to 1865. Emphasis on early African society, American slavery, and the development of black institutions and culture in the U.S. Offered as AAST 3365 and HIST 3365; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 3366 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1865-PRESENT (3-0) Emphasis on the transition from slavery to freedom, the political, social, and economic status of blacks in the late 19th century, 20th century black institutions and culture, and the evolution of the civil rights movements. Offered as AAST 3366 and HIST 3366; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 3367 AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY (3-0) Representative Indian tribes within the continental limits of the United States from pre-history to the contemporary period. Special topics: tribal cultures, the impact of European contact, and the colonial and United States Indian policies.

HIST 3368 MEXICAN AMERICAN HISTORY (3-0) The role of the Mexican American in the cultural and historical development of the United States with special emphasis on the Southwest. Offered as HIST 3368 & MAS 3368; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3369 HISTORY OF LATINO RELIGIONS (3-0) Treats selected aspects of Christianity and other religious expression to show their impact on identity formation, gender roles, politics and other aspects of Latino incorporation into American society. Offered as HIST 3369 and MAS 3369; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3370 THE IMAGE OF THE AMERICAN WEST (3-0) The way the American West has been portrayed and the part the Western myth has played in a search for a national identity. First impressions of the new world; the West in colonial literature; fiction in the 19th and 20th centuries; art, music and film; Western themes in politics; recent variations of the Western myth; the way such developments have reflected changes in popular values and a sense of national purpose.

HIST 3371 IMAGES OF THE SOUTHWEST (3-0) Examines the changing culture, architecture, and landscapes of the American Southwest as depicted in literature, art, film, television, and advertising, including the role of popular culture and commerce in creating and marketing a regional "Southwestern style." Offered as GEOG 3371 and HIST 3371; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3372 U.S. BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC HISTORY, 1607-1865 (3-0) The roots of American economic growth with an emphasis on the transition from a colonial economy dominated by merchant families to an agricultural republic. The market and transportation revolutions as well as the developing sectional conflict between the emerging Northern industrial economy and the Southern agricultural slave economy.

HIST 3373 U.S. ECONOMIC HISTORY, 1860-PRESENT (3-0) Rise of manufacturing, marketing, and electrification. Organized labor and rebellions against the corporate world. Government regulation of business and labor. Corporations and unions during depressions and wars. Auto, high tech, and other industries. The military-industrial complex. Franchising and other trends.

HIST 3374 ANCIENT GREECE (3-0) The origins, development and diversity, successes and failures of Ancient Greece from around 1500 to 31 B.C. Near Eastern and Bronze Age background; Archaic Age and the City State; Sparta and Athens; war and imperialism; democracy and culture; Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Era.

HIST 3375 ANCIENT ROME (3-0) The origin, development, expansion, problems, and achievements of the Roman Republic and Empire. Roots and rise of Rome; Roman Imperialism; Republic and Revolution; Roman Empire, Emperors, and Peace; Paganism and Christianity; Late Empire.

HIST 3376 MEDIEVAL EUROPE I (3-0) The rise of new states and cultures in western Europe and Byzantium after the Roman Empire's breakdown; institutional Christianity and the medieval papacy; foundation of the Holy Roman Empire; Islam at Europe's borders.

HIST 3377 MEDIEVAL EUROPE II (3-0) The formation of national, religious, and ethnic identities in Europe; intellectual developments associated with universities and new religious movements; the expansion of Europe's borders; and the confrontation of Western Christianity with Islam.

HIST 3378 EUROPE: THE RENAISSANCE (3-0) The political, social, and intellectual events of the Renaissance period. The rise of the modern state, the emergence of individualism, and the incipient secularization of politics, arts, and letters.

HIST 3379 EUROPE: THE REFORMATION AND COUNTER-REFORMATION (3-0) The religious reawakening and reform that swept Europe in the 16th century with its consequent religious wars. The political effects of religious reform in the remaking of European attitudes in regard to politics, society, and religion.

HIST 3380 HISTORY OF ANCIENT SPORT (3-0) The nature, variety, and role of sports in ancient history. The origin and development of sport in Greece and Rome, the Olympic Games, religious and political implications, the nature of events and contests, intellectual and popular attitudes, sport in art and society.

HIST 3382 REVOLUTIONS AND REVOLUTIONARIES IN HISTORY (3-0) A historical examination of the world's major revolutions, from the 16th through the 20th centuries.

HIST 3383 EARLY MODERN EUROPE, 1560-1715 (3-0) The major social, economic, cultural, and political developments that occurred in the major European countries from the end of the Counter-Reformation to the early eighteenth century.

HIST 3384 WAR AND SOCIAL CHANGE/MILITARY REVOLUTION (3-0) Changes in European art of war from advent of gunpowder to American rebellion. Effects of these changes upon demography, political institutions, industrial production, social structure, and taxation patterns.

HIST 3389 WORLD WAR II, 1939-1945 (3-0) Various aspects of the Second World War from American, European, and Asian perspectives. Origins of the conflict, U.S. mobilization, the Holocaust, the Soviet-German confrontation, and the legacy of the most devastating conflict in modern history.

HIST 3390 HONORS COLLOQUIUM (3-0) A multidisciplinary course designed to meet the needs of advanced undergraduates in the Honors College.

HIST 4101 MOOT COURT (1-0) Students will develop an understanding of legal debate and legal history through the study of constitutional law and legal research methods in preparation for simulated oral arguments before the Supreme Court of the United States. Attendance at statewide competitions required. May be repeated for total of 3 hours credit. This course does not satisfy distribution requirements. Offered as HIST 4101 and POLS 4101; may be taken in only one department per semester.

HIST 4191 UNDERGRADUATE CONFERENCE COURSE (1-0) Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in designated areas with tenure-track/tenured faculty. Course may be repeated for credit once with a change in faculty. Prerequisite: Prior completion of an organized course with the intended conference faculty member, plus prior approval of the instructor and the undergraduate advisor. The faculty member may petition for the student's exemption from these prerequisites.

HIST 4291 UNDERGRADUATE CONFERENCE COURSE (2-0) Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in designated areas with tenure-track/tenured faculty. Course may be repeated for credit once with a change in faculty. Prerequisite: Prior completion of an organized course with the intended conference faculty member, plus prior approval of the instructor and the undergraduate advisor. The faculty member may petition for the student's exemption from these prerequisites.

HIST 4301 HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY AND CARTOGRAPHY (3-0) An introduction to cultural and historical geography with an emphasis on cartography and the use of maps in research and teaching. Offered as GEOG 4301 and HIST 4301; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 4330 MEDIEVAL CRUSADE AND JIHAD (3-0) A history of the crusading movement of Western Europe, and the counter-crusades. This course will consider the events, ideas, and peoples involved, and their impacts on the civilizations of medieval Christendom, North Africa, and the Middle East.

HIST 4331 MEDIEVAL TRAVELERS (3-0) Medieval people traveled for a wide variety of reasons: exploration, survival, profit, belief. Students will study medieval travel accounts to understand how voyages and other travels illustrate cultural contact, communication, exchange, and diffusion of ideas.

HIST 4345 TUDOR-STUART ENGLAND, 1485-1714 (3-0) The legacy of the Wars of the Roses: the so called new monarchy of the Tudors; The Protestant Reformation in England; constitutional implications of the controversy between crown and Parliament; changes in family and social structures; the emergence of England as a world power. Credit cannot be received for both 4345 and 4346 or 4347.

HIST 4348 ENGLAND 1714-1848 (3-0) English history in the age of revolution. Topics include the consolidation of aristocratic power, nature of Parliament, rise of Empire and the American rebellion, the Industrial Revolution, the governance of Ireland, wars of the French Revolution and Napoleon, the challenge of democratic radicalism and the alternative of political reform or revolution.

HIST 4349 ENGLAND 1848 - PRESENT (3-0) English history from Victorian grandeur to 20th century decline. Topics include the growth of social stability and democracy, the rise to and fall from world supremacy in industry and empire, the labor and women's movements, the problem of Ireland, World Wars I and II, the emergence of the socialist state, and its post-1980 revision by recent prime ministers.

HIST 4350 BRITISH CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY (3-0) The development of the British constitution from its earliest beginnings to the present day, with special emphasis on the Anglo-Saxon institutions, the Norman constitutional development, the evolution of the major offices of the government, the development of Parliament, constitutional developments of the Stuarts, the Hanoverian constitution, the growth of democracy in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the imperial and commonwealth institutions.

HIST 4351 BRITISH EMPIRE (3-0) Examines the major parts of the empire--Ireland, Canada, West Indies, India, Australia/New Zealand, and South Africa--from 1600 to present. Also considers English attitudes and policies, and changing ideas of imperialism.

HIST 4352 MODERN IRELAND (3-0) The contemporary crisis in Ireland in the light of Irish history. Begins with a look at present day Ireland, North and South, then examines the history: the English conquest in the 16th and 17th centuries, the awakening of 18th century Ireland, the 19th century "Irish Question"; the South's war for independence and the creation of Northern Ireland, the rise of the I.R.A. and the Protestant terrorist groups, and recent British and Irish government policies.

HIST 4354 EARLY FRANCE: OLD REGIME AND REVOLUTION, 1610-1799 (3-0) Society and politics from the assassination of Henry IV to Napoleon. The traditions of the French people and their kings, the splendor and misery of the Age of Louis XIV, the Enlightenment of Voltaire and Rousseau, the coming of the Revolution, the Reign of Terror, and the rise of Napoleon.

HIST 4355 MODERN FRANCE, 1799-PRESENT (3-0) From Napoleon to the emergence of a modern democratic state. Social and cultural trends together with the politics of two monarchies, two empires, five republics, and two German occupations. The acceleration of change in recent decades in contrast with earlier social patterns.

HIST 4356 IMPERIAL GERMANY, 1740-1914 (3-0) Prussian, German, and Hapsburg empires. Feudal society, absolutism, German romanticism, democratization, industrialization. The challenges of nationalism, colonialism, and the collapse of the empires.

HIST 4357 MODERN GERMANY, 1914-1990 (3-0) Social, political, and cultural history of Germany through World War I and II, division of Germany into East and West and ultimate unification.

HIST 4358 THE THIRD REICH: GERMAN HISTORY, 1933 - 1945 (3-0) A pivotal event in the history of the twentieth century, Hitler's Germany continues to elicit fascination, revulsion, and controversy. Dealing with this extraordinary and deeply disturbing historical phenomenon, the seminar explores the origin, nature, and demise of the Third Reich. Beginning with the rise of the National Socialism in Weimar Germany, it goes on to examine the Nazi seizure of power, the centrality of Hitler, the ideology and racial agenda of Nazism, and the destruction of the Reich in five years of war and genocide. These and other topics, such as popular opinion and everyday life, will be discussed from a variety of perspectives - cultural, political, and socioeconomic - to provide a broad interpretative framework for understanding the genesis, consolidation, and criminality of the Nazi State.

HIST 4359 HISTORY OF RUSSIA TO 1855 (3-0) A survey of Russian history from the origins of the first Russian state through the reign of Nicholas I. Special attention to such topics as the Kievan Rus, the Mongol impact and Muscovite state, the rise of Imperial Russia, and Russia's emergence as a global power. Offered as HIST 4359 and RUSS 4359.

HIST 4360 HISTORY OF RUSSIA SINCE 1855 (3-0) A survey of Russian history from the reign of Alexander II to the present. Special attention to such topics as the decline of Imperial Russia, the rise of the revolutionary spirit, and the emergence, consolidation, and development of the Soviet state. Offered as HIST 4360 and RUSS 4360.

HIST 4361 THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE 1552-1917 (3-0) The political, social, and cultural impact of Russian imperial rule between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries; interactions between the Russian state and non-Russian nationalities during the successive stages of the Russian expansion: the Siberian frontier in the 16th and 17th centuries; the "Western Borderlands" (Eastern Europe) from the 18th century on; the Russian presence in the Caucasus and Central Asia in the 19th century. Special focus on the structure and functioning of Russian imperial institutions; types of contact between Russians and non-Russians (strategies of conquest, resistance, forms of collaboration); and the production of culture and knowledge in the service of the Russian empire.

HIST 4362 RUSSIA AND THE SUCCESSOR STATES TODAY (3-0) The metamorphosis of the Communist Party and the current political philosophies of the post-Soviet states. Examination of attitudes and self-perceptions of citizens of these states in the post-Soviet period. Offered as HIST, POLS, and RUSS 4362; credit will be given in only one department.

HIST 4365 HISTORY OF SPAIN AND PORTUGAL (3-0) The cultural, political and economic history of the Iberian peninsula from ancient times. The medieval epoch; the Catholic Church; the overseas empires of Spain and Portugal, and their artistic achievements. The monarchist ideal, as well as political ideologies such as liberalism, Marxism, anarchism, and fascism.

HIST 4366 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: ORIGINS THROUGH INDEPENDENCE (3-0) Latin America during the colonial period of Spanish and Portuguese rule. Pre-European civilizations; Iberian backgrounds; conquest of indigenous peoples; development of colonial institutions, economic patterns, social structures, and race relations; independence from Europe.

HIST 4367 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: POST-INDEPENDENCE TO THE PRESENT (3-0) The evolution of six Latin American nations during the 19th and 20th centuries. The social, economic, and political development of three social groups in three regions: the Europeanized southern cone area of Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay; the indigenous culture of the Andean mountains in Peru; the African background of Brazil and Cuba.

HIST 4368 HISTORY OF MEXICO (3-0) Mexican history from its pre-Colonial indigenous foundation to the current situation. A social and economic analysis of the major events in Mexican history with emphasis upon the 19th and 20th centuries. The major theme in this class is the growth of Mexican nationalism and its relation to region, religion and ethnicity. Also listed as MAS 4368.

HIST 4369 HISTORY OF THE CARIBBEAN (3-0) A comparative history of the different societies in the Caribbean (including Cuba, Jamaica, and Haiti) with emphasis on the coming of slavery and the consequences of emancipation. Will trace development of emerging new societies from intermingling of Amerindian, African and European elements.

HIST 4370 AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE WEST (3-0) A history of African Americans in the West, focusing on the experiences of the first Africans who accompanied the first European explorers in the West and Southwest; the post-Civil War migration and settlement of African Americans in the West in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and the development and impact of the "West Coast" experience on African American culture. Offered as AAST 4370 and HIST 4370; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 4374 AFRICAN HISTORY I (3-0) Examines African prehistory, ancient civilizations, religion, gender issues, slavery, and commerce in precolonial Africa. Offered as AAST 4374 and HIST 4374; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 4375 AFRICAN HISTORY II (3-0) Africa from the "Scramble for Africa" through the establishment of the various colonial systems, through the beginnings of African nationalism, to the contemporary period. The African Revolution and the development of the independent African states. Offered as AAST 4375 and HIST 4375; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 4376 AFRICAN DIASPORA I (3-0) The major developments which have shaped the history of Africans and their descendants in the Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Indian Ocean areas from the earliest times to 1800. Emphasis on the comparative history of Black Diasporic communities; linkages between Africans and their descendants in the Diaspora. Offered as AAST 4376 and HIST 4376; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 4377 AFRICAN DIASPORA II (3-0) The major developments which have shaped the history of Africans and their descendants in Latin America, the Caribbean, and North America since 1800. Emphasis on the comparative history of Black Diasporic communities; linkages between Africans and their descendants in the Atlantic Diaspora. Offered as AAST 4377 and HIST 4377; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 4378 WEST AFRICA AND THE ATLANTIC DIASPORA (3-0) This course examines the history of West Africa and how this region was integrated into the Atlantic world through the Atlantic slave trade. The course adopts an interdisciplinary approach that integrates traditional classroom instruction with field-based learning in West Africa. This learning method, combined with cultural immersion, challenges students to develop their academic and cross-cultural knowledge and skills. Offered as AAST 4378 and HIST 4378; credit will be granted in only one department.

HIST 4379 HISTORY OF MODERN CHINA (3-0) The Ching dynasty and China's response to the West. Revolution and republic, warlords, and the Japanese occupation during World War II. Civil War and the development of the People's Republic of China.

HIST 4383 HITLER: HISTORY & IMAGE (3-0) Hitler has been vilified, ridiculed, idolized, and mythologized. In this course, we will examine Hitler the historical figure as well as the image of Hitler created through literature, theatre, and cinema.

HIST 4384 DEMOCRACY AND DICTATORSHIP IN EUROPE (3-0) The political landscape of Europe from 1917 to 2000. Topics will include the varying expressions of communism, facism, Nazism, liberal democracy, and authoritarian dictatorship.

HIST 4388 SELECTED TOPICS IN HISTORY (3-0) Subjects of immediate interest in the various fields of history. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

HIST 4391 UNDERGRADUATE CONFERENCE COURSE (3-0) Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in designated areas with tenure-track/tenured faculty. Course may be repeated for credit once with a change in faculty. Prerequisite: Prior completion of an organized course with the intended conference faculty member, plus prior approval of the instructor and the undergraduate advisor. The faculty member may petition for the student's exemption from these prerequisites.

HIST 4394 HONORS THESIS/SENIOR PROJECT (0-0) Required of all students in the University Honors College. During the senior year, the student must complete a thesis or a project under the direction of a faculty member in the major department.

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