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Course List


BIOL 1282 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY LABORATORY (0-3) Laboratory exercises will illustrate basic concepts covered in BIOL 1333 and BIOL 1334. This course is for non-science majors, and, with 1333 and 1334, will satisfy the laboratory science requirements for students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Business Administration and in the School of Social Work. Prerequisite: BIOL 1333.

BIOL 1301 NUTRITION (3-0) Nutrients essential to an adequate diet and good health and the nutritive values of common foods are reviewed. Offered as BIOL 1301 and HEED 1301: credit will be granted for only one of these courses. Students seeking certification in Health Education must enroll in HEED 1301. Students seeking credit toward their science requirement must enroll in BIOL 1301. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a BS degree in biology, microbiology, or medical technology.

BIOL 1333 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY I (3-0) (BIOL 1408) Emphasis is on fundamental principles, concepts, and topical subjects relating to biology. This course is for non-science majors and with 1334 and 1282, will satisfy the laboratory science requirements for students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Business Administration, and in the School of Social Work.

BIOL 1334 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY II (3-0) A continuation of BIOL 1333. Students are encouraged to apply pertinent biological concepts to biologically-based problems in today's society. This course is for non-science majors, and with 1333 and 1282 will satisfy the laboratory science requirements for students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Business Administration and in the School of Social Work. Prerequisite: BIOL 1333.

BIOL 1433 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY I (3-2) This course is for non-science majors and with BIOL 1434, will satisfy the laboratory science requirements for students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Business Administration, and in the School of Social Work. Emphasis is on fundamental principles, concepts, and topical subjects relating to biology. Laboratory experiments are designed to complement theory presented in lecture. Formerly listed as BIOL 1333, credit will not be granted for both.

BIOL 1434 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY II (3-2) A continuation of BIOL 1433. Students are encouraged to apply pertinent biological concepts to biologically-based problems in today's society. This course is for non-science majors, and with 1433 will satisfy the laboratory science requirements for students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Business Administration and in the School of Social Work. Laboratory experiments are designed to complement theory presented in lecture. Prerequisite: BIOL 1433, or BIOLTRAN, or BIOL 1333. Formerly listed as BIOL 1334, credit will not be granted for both.

BIOL 1441 CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3-2) (BIOL 1406) The first of a three-part introductory biology sequence, this course focuses on the chemical and molecular basis of life, including metabolism, cell structure and function, and genetics. Laboratory experiments are designed to complement theory presented in lecture. Formerly listed as BIOL 1449; credit will not be given for both.

BIOL 1442 STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF ORGANISMS (3-2) The study of structure and function in plants and animals. Topics to be covered include structure at the level of the cell, tissue, organ and individual growth, transport/circulation/gas exchange, nutrition, reproduction, development, endocrinology, and animal neural regulation. The laboratory will examine plant and animal structure and function with observational and experimental approaches. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441.

BIOL 1450 COMPUTER LITERACY IN BIOLOGY (3-3) Basic computer skills and the utilization of biological resources on the Internet. Assignments are constructed to enable the student to acquire skills in the use of software programs on graphics, statistics, spread sheets, and word processing as they apply to the biological sciences. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 2300 INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS (3-0) Introduction to the collection, description, and analysis of data with statistical methods appropriate for biological sciences. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and BIOL 1442, or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 2317 BASIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN SEXUALITY (3-0) The physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Offered as BIOL 2317, HEED 2317, PSYC 2317, and WOMS 2317. Credit will be granted for one of these courses only. Students seeking certification in Health Education must enroll in HEED 2317. Students seeking credit toward their science requirement must enroll in BIOL 2317. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a BS degree in biology, microbiology, medical technology, psychology, or sociology.

BIOL 2343 EVOLUTION & ECOLOGY (3-0) Reviews significant aspects of organismal biology and presents current hypotheses concerning the origin and diversification of life on earth. The ecological and behavioral interactions between organisms and their biotic/abiotic environments are considered from an evolutionary perspective. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441.

BIOL 2350 MATHEMATICAL MODELING IN ECOLOGY (3-0) An introductory course in modeling techniques in biology with emphasis on construction and interpretation of models in ecology and epidemiology. Computational tools will allow students to work with mathematical models based on difference and differential equations. The goals of this course will include teaching programming skills and illustrating how biological knowledge is used in this computational approach. Offered as BIOL 2350 and MATH 2350. Credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 1441 and MATH 1426 or HONR-SC 1426.

BIOL 2457 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (3-2) Functional morphology of humans, cellular function, principles of support and movement, and neural and endocrine control systems. Laboratory exercises involve both anatomical and experimental aspects of principles introduced in the lecture. This class is designed for students in sport activities (EXSA), medical technology and pre-nursing. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 or equivalent, or approval of the department. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a B.S. degree in biology or microbiology.

BIOL 2458 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (3-2) Functional morphology of humans, maintenance of the human body, and continuity of life. Topics will include the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, immune, and reproductive systems. Laboratory exercises explore both anatomical and experimental aspects of principles introduced in the lecture. This class is designed for students in sport activities (EXSA), medical technology, and pre-nursing. Prerequisite: BIOL 2457 or equivalent. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a B.S. degree in biology or microbiology.

BIOL 2460 NURSING MICROBIOLOGY (3-3) The intention of this course is to present basic information, relevant to nursing practice, with the principles of microbiology and the nature of microbial disease. This course will give the nursing student a fundamental background of knowledge that will be applicable to the care of infectious patients, to the control of microbial diseases, and an understanding of microorganisms. The laboratory will provide practice in aseptic techniques, the use of disinfectants and antimicrobial agents, and microscopic study of bacteria. This course cannot be applied for credit toward a degree in Biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 or equivalent.

BIOL 3101 CURRENT TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-0) Seminar on significant topics and issues in modern biology. Students will present seminars on selected topics and participate in discussions of those topics. Topics will vary depending on instructor. This course will satisfy the oral communication competency required in Biology. May be repeated once for biology credit.

BIOL 3131 SERVICE LEARNING (1-0) Service learning is a credit-bearing learning experience; therefore, credit is awarded for academic learning and not for service hours. Students engage in classroom activities, assignments, and discussions and in addition, integrate course content and learning outcomes with genuine community needs or issues. Collaborations with the community result in relationship ┬┐building and partnerships through intentional, structured service experiences. Students are required to analyze and evaluate these experiences by engaging in reflective activities, such as discussion and journaling. This process of structured service and learning in the community promote a sense of civic responsibility and commitment to others. Students commit to serve weekly time resulting in at least fifteen hours during one semester. This time is agreed upon by student, faculty, and community agency. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

BIOL 3149 COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY (10-0) The purpose of this course is to allow students to earn college credit for relevant field work in the areas of biology and microbiology. Students must apply for the program and be cleared for registration during the semester prior to enrollment. These courses are offered on a pass/fail basis.

BIOL 3170 LIMNOLOGY LABORATORY (0-3) A laboratory and field-based course designed to acquaint the student with common laboratory practices in the study of inland waters. Prerequisite: BIOL 3318 or concurrent enrollment.

BIOL 3231 SERVICE LEARNING (2-0) Service learning is a credit-bearing learning experience; therefore, credit is awarded for academic learning and not for service hours. Students engage in classroom activities, assignments, and discussions and in addition, integrate course content and learning outcomes with genuine community needs or issues. Collaborations with the community result in relationship ┬┐building and partnerships through intentional, structured service experiences. Students are required to analyze and evaluate these experiences by engaging in reflective activities, such as discussion and journaling. This process of structured service and learning in the community promote a sense of civic responsibility and commitment to others. Students commit to serve weekly time resulting in at least fifteen hours during one semester. This time is agreed upon by student, faculty, and community agency. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

BIOL 3249 COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY (10-0) The purpose of this course is to allow students to earn college credit for relevant field work in the areas of biology and microbiology. Students must apply for the program and be cleared for registration during the semester prior to enrollment. These courses are offered on a pass/fail basis.

BIOL 3301 CELL PHYSIOLOGY (3-0) An introduction to the basic physical, chemical, and biological principles which govern function in eukaryotic cells, and the relationships between cells and their environments. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441. CHEM 2181 and 2321 are recommended.

BIOL 3303 DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR (3-0) A survey of the psychoactive agents, their therapeutic uses, and social abuses. Alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, narcotics, hallucinogens, stimulants, and tranquilizers. Offered as BIOL 3303, HEED 3303, and PSYC 3303; credit will be granted only once. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a B.S. degree in biology, microbiology, or medical technology. Students seeking certification in health education must enroll in HEED 3303.

BIOL 3305 SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3-0) Study and application of the written and verbal communication skills involved in gathering, analyzing, and distributing scientific and technical information efficiently and accurately for specific scientific audiences. Can be used to satisfy the Technical Writing portion of English, Technical Writing and Speech requirement. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 1442, or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 3309 NON-MAJORS SELECTED TOPICS (3-0) Topics in biology not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as different topics are offered. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a B.A. or B.S. degree in biology or a B.S. degree in microbiology.

BIOL 3310 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (3-0) Topics in biology not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for biology elective credit as different topics are offered. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 3311 SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY (3-0) Topics in microbiology not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for microbiology elective credit as different topics are offered. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444.

BIOL 3312 IMMUNOBIOLOGY (3-0) An introduction to the components, properties, and manifestations of the adaptive immune response that occurs in vertebrates. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444. CHEM 2181, 2321 are recommended.

BIOL 3315 GENETICS (3-0) Principles of molecular and classical genetics. The function and transmission of hereditary material in microorganisms, plants, and animals, including humans. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441.

BIOL 3316 ASTROBIOLOGY (3-0) This is an interdisciplinary course between astrophysics, biology, and geology. Topics include properties of life, origin and evolution of life on Earth, mass extinctions, extremophiles, search for life in the Solar System, space missions, stellar habitable zones, SETI, Fermi paradox, Drake equation. Prerequisites: PHYS 1441, 1442, PHYS 2315 or 3315, and BIOL 3315, or permission by the instructor. Prerequisites for BIOL Majors: PHYS 1441, 1442 and BIOL 3315. Offered as BIOL 3316, GEOL 3316, and PHYS 3316; credit will be granted only once.

BIOL 3317 GENOMICS (3-0) This course presents an integrative approach to genome science, combining elements of genetics, state of the art technologies in genomic analysis. A basic knowledge of genetics and probability concepts is required. Use of the World Wide Web will be an essential part of the course. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3318 LIMNOLOGY (3-0) The living and nonliving components of inland waters. An introduction to the geological, physical, and chemical background, and to the major organisms and ecological processes. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442 or equivalent.

BIOL 3319 HUMAN GENETICS (3-0) This course will enable students to comprehend the basic principles of genetics applied to human inheritance and disease, to interpret the research strategies aimed to identify and study the genes responsible for diverse functions and traits, as well as to assess the consequences of the genetic technologies in our society. Prerequisites: BIOL 1441 and 3315.

BIOL 3320 GENETICS-EL PAS (3-0)

BIOL 3322 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR (3-0) An introduction to the anatomical structures and physiological processes that determine behavior. Topics include the acquisition and processing of sensory information, the neural control of movement, and the biological bases of complex behaviors (such as learning, memory, sex, language, and addiction), as well as the basic functioning of the nervous system. Offered as BIOL 3322 and PSYC 3322. Credit will be granted only once. BIOL 3322 prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442. PSYC 3322 prerequisite: BIOL 1441 or PSYC 1315.

BIOL 3325 PLANT ECOLOGY (3-0) Introduction to the field of plant ecology including physiological, population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1442, 2343.

BIOL 3326 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3-0) A survey of research and theory comparing behavior at various phyletic levels. Offered as BIOL 3326 and PSYC 3326. Credit will be granted for only one of these courses. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 3327 MICROBIAL DIVERSITY (3-0) This course is an introduction to the great diversity of microbial life. The topic material explores this diversity by considering the great age of bacteria, their evolution, biochemistry, habitat and form. The course of study focuses attention on organisms not commonly encountered in General Microbiology laboratories. Prerequisite: BIOL 3444 Microbiology

BIOL 3328 ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (3-0) An introduction to the principles, methodology, and practical applications and implications of environmental microbiology. Lecture topics include habitat and community approaches to environmental microbiology, measures of microbial populations and activities, interactions among microbial communities, the role of microorganisms in the origin of mineral resources, microorganisms and pollution, and current developments on energy flow through microbial communities. Prerequisite: BIOL 3444.

BIOL 3329 BEHAVIORAL ENDOCRINOLOGY (3-0) The effects of hormones on behavior and the physiological mechanisms which mediate these effects. Principles of brain-hormone interaction, sexual and aggressive behavior, parental care, ingestion, activity, motivation, learning and memory, behavioral disorders, environmental, and experiential influences on hormone production. Also offered as BIOL 3329; credit will be granted for only one of these courses. Students seeking credit toward the science requirement must enroll in BIOL 3329. Prerequisite: PSYC 1315 or BIOL 4315.

BIOL 3330 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (3-0) The primary goal of this course is to describe how organismic complexity is generated during embryonic and post-embryonic development. The course will cover current areas of research in developmental biology which include: the roles of genetic networks, induction events, cell lineage, maternal inheritance, cell-cell communication, and hormonal control in developmental processes in well-suited organisms such as vertebrates, insects, and nematodes. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315.

BIOL 3331 SERVICE LEARNING (3-0) Service learning is a credit-bearing learning experience; therefore, credit is awarded for academic learning and not for service hours. Students engage in classroom activities, assignments, and discussions and in addition, integrate course content and learning outcomes with genuine community needs or issues. Collaborations with the community result in relationship ┬┐building and partnerships through intentional, structured service experiences. Students are required to analyze and evaluate these experiences by engaging in reflective activities, such as discussion and journaling. This process of structured service and learning in the community promote a sense of civic responsibility and commitment to others. Students commit to serve weekly time resulting in at least fifteen hours during one semester. This time is agreed upon by student, faculty, and community agency. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

BIOL 3339 INTRODUCTION TO EVOLUTION (3-0) The goals of this course are: to introduce students to the process of evolution, the patterns that result, and the way that evolutionary history has shaped the diversity of organisms on Earth; to explore how evolutionary biologists formulate and test hypotheses; to investigate applications of evolutionary biology to mainstream medical research; and to investigate current controversies in evolutionary biology. Prerequisites: Biol 1441 & 3315 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3341 ENTOMOLOGY (2-3) This course is a study of the basic principles of insect life including structure, physiology, life cycles, and classification. Certain related arthropods are included. Lab work emphasizes collection and identification of local insects. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 3345 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (3-0) Study of human function from the cellular through organismal levels. Attention will be paid to the interrelationships between physiological research and medicine. Will give students a knowledge of the basic principles of structure, function and functional integration of human tissues and organs. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 1442.

BIOL 3349 COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY (10-0) The purpose of this course is to allow students to earn college credit for relevant field work in the areas of biology and microbiology. Students must apply for the program and be cleared for registration during the semester prior to enrollment. These courses are offered on a pass/fail basis.

BIOL 3350 DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS IN BIOLOGY (3-0) An introductory course in the existence and properties of solutions of differential and difference equations, qualitative analysis methods, and numerical solutions of differential equations using finite-difference methods. Offered as BIOL 3350 and MATH 3350: credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL/MATH 2350 or consent of the instructor.

BIOL 3351 PROBABILITY AND RANDOM PROCESSES IN BIOLOGY (3-0) Introduction to random processes arising in biological modeling. Topics include introduction to probability, Poisson processes, birth-death processes, Markov chains, and Markov processes. Course taught as BIOL 3351 and MATH 3351; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 3350 or MATH 3350 or consent of the instructor.

BIOL 3352 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC LAB SCIENCE (2-3) An introduction to the various disciplines of Forensic Science including DNA analysis, drug analysis, and firearms basics. Laboratory consists of hands-on investigation of mock crime scenes, fingerprint enhancement methods, and biological analysis of fluids. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, CHEM 1441.

BIOL 3355 TOXICOLOGY (3-0) An introduction to the general principles of toxicology with an emphasis on certain classes of toxic agents, their sources and toxic effects, as well as their environmental fates. Pollution of various media (air, water and soil) and the differences between them will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 or 4 hours of BIOLTRAN; CHEM 1441 and CHEM 1442.

BIOL 3356 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS (3-0) Biological components of environmental systems. Population dynamics, species interactions, community structure, biodiversity, bioenergetics, nutrient cycling and human impacts are reviewed. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343.

BIOL 3357 MARINE BIOLOGY (3-0) Principles of oceanographic and ocean circulation, adaptations of marine organisms to their environment, ecological principles of marine biology and human impacts on the sea. Prerequites: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 3420 GENETICS METHODS LAB (0-4) Computational and experimental approach to genomics research. The course theme will be transposable elements. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315.

BIOL 3427 PLANT SCIENCE (3-3) A survey of plant science including the importance of plants to people and the human side of botany: the structure, reproduction, physiology, and classification of plants. The laboratory includes the study of structure, function, reproduction, and classification of plants. Replaces BIOL 3327 and BIOL 3183. Credit cannot be given for BIOL 3427 and BIOL 3327 and 3183. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442 or equivalent.

BIOL 3442 PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (3-3) A comparative study of animal function. Evidence from different groups of animals, particularly the vertebrates, to identify the general principles of physiological mechanisms operating at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels. Laboratory studies will complement lecture material and will stress experimental design, data analysis, and the understanding of critical research in physiology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442. BIOL 3301 recommended.

BIOL 3444 GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (3-3) Fundamental principals of microbiology including the structure and function of microbial cells and their activities in nature. Bacteria will be used in the laboratory to provide training and experimental methodology. Formerly listed as BIOL 2451; credit will not be granted for both. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and one year of Chemistry.

BIOL 3445 METHODS IN MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY (1-3) An overview of different techniques used during manipulation of microorganisms. It will allow students to gain an historical perspective of techniques used in microbiology as well as learn state of the art molecular characterization of microorganisms and their genetic manipulation. Introduces biochemical, physiological, and molecular biology methods to assess community diversity and microbial activity in a variety of ecosystems. Bacterial growth and survival, population biology, and microbial interactions will also be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 3444.

BIOL 3446 HUMAN ANATOMY (3-3) Study of the gross functional anatomy of the human body. Students will participate in laboratory exercises designed to familiarize them with human anatomical structures and their functions. Use of eponyms for anatomical terms will be minimized. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442 or 8 hours of Bioltran.

BIOL 3452 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (3-4) A comparative study of the anatomy of the protochordates and the vertebrates. The laboratory includes a detailed study of the shark and the cat. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343. BIOL 3454 recommended, but not required.

BIOL 3454 GENERAL ZOOLOGY (3-3) An overview of animal life including the diversity and evolution of major animal phyla, reproduction, development and aspects of physiological function. The laboratory examines form, function and phyletic relationships in a wide variety of animal types. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3457 GENERAL ECOLOGY (3-3) An examination of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the relationship between the biological and physical environments (organisms, food, space, and time) at the individual, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343.

BIOL 4150 SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY (1-0) Formulation and definition of interdisciplinary research problems in Mathematical Biology, the formulation and execution of strategies of solution, and the presentation of results. Research under faculty supervision and mentorship involving collaboration within a small group. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

BIOL 4179 DIRECTED STUDY (1-0) Independent study by individual students in biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. Topics must be approved by the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, and permission of instructor.

BIOL 4189 RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY (0-0) Research problems on an individual basis, conducted under the direction of a member of the biology faculty. A limit of two hours per semester is imposed and only a total of three hours may be counted toward degree requirements. These courses are offered only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite:written permission of the supervising instructor prior to registration.

BIOL 4279 DIRECTED STUDY (2-0) Independent study by individual students in biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. Topics must be approved by the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, and permission of instructor.

BIOL 4289 RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY (0-0) Research problems on an individual basis, conducted under the direction of a member of the biology faculty. A limit of two hours per semester is imposed and only a total of three hours may be counted toward degree requirements. These courses are offered only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite:written permission of the supervising instructor prior to registration.

BIOL 4301 INTRODUCTION TO NEUROSCIENCE (3-0) An in depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying the function of the nervous system. Topics include cellular mechanisms of neural communication, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of sensory, motor, and autonomic systems, cellular mechanisms of learning and memory, and neuropathological conditions that contribute to neurological disorders. Course offered as BIOL 4301 and PSYC 4301. Credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: PSYC 3322 (BIOL 3322) or permission of instructor.

BIOL 4302 MICROBIAL GENETICS (3-0) Consideration of the physical, chemical, and functional nature of genetic processes in micro-organisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 3444, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 4307 MOLECULAR EVOLUTION (3-0) This course focuses on understanding how genes and genomes evolve at the molecular level. Molecular biology provides the data while population genetics provides the theoretical framework. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315, BIOL 3339.

BIOL 4308 GENOME STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS (3-0) This course will describe how genes and genomes are organized in a variety of species from all kingdoms of life and will provide a detailed overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the function and evolution of genomes. Particular emphasis will be given to the human genome project and its biomedical implications. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315.

BIOL 4309 NEUROPHARMACOLOGY (3-0) A survey of how drugs affect the nervous system. General topics will include cellular and molecular foundations of neuropharmacology, receptors and modulation of neural signaling. The specific role of neurotransmitter systems (i.e. acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and opiate) will be explored. Offered as BIOL 4309 and PSYC 4309; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: one or more of the following courses or permission of instructor: BIOL 1441 or PSYC/BIOL 3322 or BIOL 3301.

BIOL 4312 INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY (3-0) The nature, reproduction, and host cell interactions of viruses and virus-like agents of bacteria, animals, and plants. Prerequisite: BIOL 3444.

BIOL 4313 MOLECULAR GENETICS (3-0) A comprehensive survey of molecular genetics with an emphasis on eucaryotic systems: DNA structure and chromosome arrangement; molecular evolution; gene regulation and expression; RNA processing; signal transduction; cancer biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3315.

BIOL 4315 GENERAL ENDOCRINOLOGY (3-0) The vertebrate endocrine system. The cellular origin of hormones, their role in physiological regulation, and the mechanism of hormone action. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 3301, 3315; at least one physiology course, and senior standing.

BIOL 4317 BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS (3-0) Host-pathogen relationships in microbial diseases. Topics include bacterium-host interactions; pathogens and pathogenic factors; techniques in pathogenesis research; molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis by major bacterial pathogens; antimicrobial compounds and resistance to antibiotics; and discussion of human genomics and susceptibility to infections. Prerequisites: BIOL 3312, 3444

BIOL 4325 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOBIOLOGY (3-0) The biological basis of behavioral development. A survey of the influences of maternal factors, genes, hormones, teratogens, early nutrition, and environmental change upon the maturation of the central nervous system. Basic concepts such as critical periods, the organization of behavioral systems, neural plasticity, and the ontogeny of consciousness. Also offered as BIOL 4325; credit will be granted only once. Students seeking credit toward the science requirement must enroll in BIOL 4325. Prerequisite: PSYC 3310 or PSYC 3322 or BIOL 3322 or BIOL 3346.

BIOL 4327 BEHAVIORAL GENETICS (3-0) Genetic influences on behavioral phenotypes. Research strategies, quantitative methods, and pharmacogenetic approaches to the brain; sociality and altruism; the personality, emotionality and intelligence; psychopathology; chromosomal abnormalities; forensic implications of genetic counseling. Also offered as BIOL 4327; credit will be granted only once. Students seeking credit toward the science requirement must enroll in BIOL 4327. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315 or PSYC 2444.

BIOL 4329 NEURAL ENGINEERING (3-0) This course consists of both lecture/discussion and laboratory. Lecture topics include central and peripheral nervous system injury and regeneration, brain/machine interfacing, primary culture of neural cells, neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disease. Laboratories include embryonic and neonatal rat derived neuronal culturing, immunostaining and quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, CSE 1310, CHEM 2322, and MATH 3319.

BIOL 4330 EVOLUTION OF DEVELOPMENT (3-0) The diversity of animal and plant forms can largely be raced to evolutionary changes in the genes that control the development of the embryo. Changes in when and where these genes are active have been important in the diversification of body form. A major goal of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary framework for studies related to evolution, genetics, and development. The course will mainly consist of lecturers and seminars; relevant scientific papers will be read and commented on in class. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315.

BIOL 4331 ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3-0) Molecular biology, protein-nucleic acid interactions, nucleic acid biochemistry, and the RNA World. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 3315, General Chemistry (CHEM 1441 & 1442). Recommended, but not required: CHEM 2321.

BIOL 4332 POLYMERS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (3-0) This is a foundation course in polymeric biomaterial design, synthesis, characterization, and processing. The topics include design, surface-engineering, functionalization, characterization, as well as micro- and nano-fabrication of polymeric biomaterials. The biomedical applications of the polymeric biomaterials and their interaction with cell/tissue is discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 3301, CSE 1310, CHEM 2322 and MATH 3319.

BIOL 4333 NANOBIOMATERIALS (3-0) Synthesis, fabrication, characterization, and biomedical applications of nanobiomaterials. Topics include synthetic nanobiomaterials, biological nanobiomaterials (DNA nanomaterials, protein and peptide nanomaterials, etc.), biofunctionalization of nanobiomaterials, use of nanobiomaterials in tissue engineering, drug delivery, gene delivery. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, CSE 1310, CHEM 2322, and MATH 3319.

BIOL 4338 COMMUNITY ECOLOGY (3-0) The effects interspecific interactions have on the distribution and abundance of organisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343, and three semester hours of ecology.

BIOL 4345 MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY (3-0) This course considers the anatomy and physiology of the bacterial cell in detail. Lecture topics consider the molecular architecture of cell walls, membranes and organelles, synthesis of wall material and membranes, insertion of proteins into membranes and regulation of biosynthetic systems at the whole cell level. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 3444. CHEM 4311 recommended.

BIOL 4346 TECHNIQUES IN MICROBIAL AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (1-5) A laboratory based techniques course focusing on current methods in microbial and molecular genetics. Students will design experiments and perform: bacterial mutagenesis and phage transduction; selection, screening and physical mapping of mutants; blots, plasmid manipulations including purification, digestion, subcloning, bacterial transformations; PCR and DNA sequencing. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444, and 3315 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 4350 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (3-0) Introduction to theory and practice of conservation biology, with emphasis on applications of modern quantitative and genetic techniques to preservation of organisms and habitats. Topics include identification and prioritization of units for protection; conservation genetics; preserve design; public policy issues; and case studies. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315 or equivalent (Genetics), or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 4352 FORENSIC BIOLOGY (3-0) A comprehensive review of biological principles, applied to forensic science, including sample recovery and handling, analytical techniques, profile matching/exclusion, reporting, and testimony. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315; statistics course recommended; or permission of instructor.

BIOL 4355 METHODS IN FORENSIC BIOLOGY (1-6) Analysis of typical biological evidentiary samples including extraction of DNA, quantitation, amplification and electrophoresis of examples. Instrumentation utilized includes thermal cyclers and ABI 377 genetic analyzer. Prerequisite: BIOL 4352 or concurrent enrollment.

BIOL 4357 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3-0) This course provides a broad introduction to health psychology and its interface with the medical world. The course provides a balanced presentation of the important issues in the field, as well as specific content topics that are especially relevant today to better understand health and illness. Offered as BIOL 4357, HEED 4357, and PSYC 4357. Students seeking science requirement credit must enroll in BIOL 4357; students seeking Certification in Health must enroll in HEED 4357. Prerequisite: PSYC 1315 or BIOL 1333 or BIOL 1441 or BIOL 2457; junior standing recommended.

BIOL 4365 TISSUE ENGINEERING LAB (0-3) Each student will be given the opportunity to perform the techniques commonly used in tissue engineering and biomaterial research. These techniques are culture media preparation, cell culture/subculture, degradable scaffold preparation, scaffold modification, histological sections and staining, and cell imaging analyses. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, CSE 1310, CHEM 2322, and MATH 3319.

BIOL 4379 DIRECTED STUDY (3-0) Independent study by individual students in biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. Topics must be approved by the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, and permission of instructor.

BIOL 4388 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES IN BIOLOGY (6-0) Students will participate in laboratory instruction and student recitation sessions under the supervision of a faculty member. A maximum of 3 hours can be applied to the major for biology or microbiology credit. Enrollment by departmental permission only. A maximum of 6 hours credit from this class will be used to calculate a student's grade point average. Students on probation or who have not qualified for major status may not enroll in this course.

BIOL 4391 RESEARCH WORKSHOP IN MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY (3-0) Special topics in mathematics are assigned to individuals or small groups. Faculty members closely supervise the projects and assign library reference material. Small groups will hold seminars at suitable intervals. May be repeated for credit.

BIOL 4393 HONORS SENIOR PROJECT IN BIOLOGY (1-5) A topic will be selected after consultation with a supervising professor and will involve both original research and writing a formal report. The work will be evaluated by a faculty honors committee. Completion of this course will satisfy the thesis requirement for the Honors College described elsewhere in this catalog.

BIOL 4395 FORENSICS-EL PA (3-0)

BIOL 4440 Laboratory Methods in Bacterial Pathogenesis (1-3) This course is intended to expose students to research techniques for studying bacterial pathogens. Students will use molecular and classical techniques to isolate, identify, and characterize bacteria and their response to stimuli. Techniques will range from polymerase chain reaction (PCR), gene sequencing, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Immunofluorescence Microscopy. Prerequisites: BIOL 3312, 3444, 4317, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 4444 VERTEBRATE NATURAL HISTORY (3-3) Lecture will cover the systematics, life histories, morphology, ethology and distribution of world vertebrates, with emphasis on tetrapods. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to examine and identify a taxonomically comprehensive collection of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343.

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