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The School of Urban and Public Affairs

Today is Monday, July 28, 2014

The School of Urban and Public Affairs



Dean: Barbara Becker, Ph.D.
501C University Hall · Box 19588 · 817-272-3071
www.uta.edu/supa

Message from Dean Barbara Becker, Ph.D.

Dean Barbara Becker, Ph.D.

Thank you for your interest in the School of Urban and Public Affairs and its many fine programs. We want you to have as much information as you need in making the important decision regarding the program that best fits your interests, goals, and aspirations. We at SUPA hope you find our school and one of its excellent programs the perfect place for you.

Since SUPA’s beginnings in 1967 as a legislatively mandated research, service and teaching institute, the school has grown into the internationally recognized School of Urban and Public Affairs that offers the best possible interdisciplinary approach to understanding the world and society. The faculty members of our nationally ranked and accredited programs are the foundation of our Bachelor’s of Science and our Bachelor’s of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies and our two minors. Our interdisciplinary approach provides a broad scope and rich intellectual experience to help our graduates meet the challenges of complex issues they will face. The multidisciplinary faculty offers curriculum that balances the theoretical and applied perspectives so that students are given ample opportunities for hands on experiences.

Our students comprise a culturally diverse group that comes from across Texas and the nation as well as from around the world. Our degrees and minors provide knowledge and skills utilized across a broad spectrum of disciplines. By their very nature, our BA and BS degrees in Interdisciplinary Studies and minors attract students from all over campus who approach their collegiate experience as true Mavericks do, thinking outside the box from multiple perspectives. Many of our graduates use their degree as springboards into graduate work as well as medical and legal professions.

Students are encouraged to be active in the Interdisciplinary National Leadership Organization and other student organization on campus.  These groups have social events, help in organizing student travel to state and national conferences, and provide a network of colleagues for years to come.

There never has been a more exciting or opportune time to undertake undergraduate studies in the School of Urban and Public Affairs. Modern issues, whether environmental, health, social or business, are far too complex not to understand them from a multidisciplinary perspective. Our degrees and minor programs all challenge you to see the world in its many dimensions. Students from across the nation and from around the world are here. We invite you to join us.


Overview

The School of Urban and Public Affairs offers two undergraduate degrees and two undergraduate minors as follows:

  • BA, Interdisciplinary Studies
  • BS, Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Minor, Urban and Public Affairs (with emphasis areas in Public Administration, Urban Affairs and Public Policy, and Urban Planning and the Environment)
  • Minor, Environmental and Sustainability Studies


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Faculty
Dean

Professor Becker

Professors

Anjomani, Barrett, Cole

Associate Professors

Arvidson, Audirac, Coursey, Hissong, Li, Martinez-Cosio, Rodriguez

Assistant Professors

Bezboruah, Casey, Connor, Grodach, Paulson, Welch, Whittemore

Professors Emeritus

Geisel, Taebel



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Minor in Urban and Public Affairs

The minor in Urban and Public Affairs focuses on particular aspects of the urban experience and offers an opportunity for students to prepare for career opportunities in public administration, urban affairs and public policy, and urban planning and the environment. Students who choose to pursue the minor in Urban and Public Affairs complete eighteen hours of course work including two required core courses (URPA 1301 and URPA 3301) plus four additional courses (12 hours) selected from in one of the three emphasis areas. Students interested in the minor in Urban and Public Affairs should consult first with the advisor in their department or program, then with one of the Undergraduate Advisors in the School of Urban and Public Affairs. Students completing any of this minor may petition to have six hours of credit waived from an appropriate masters degree in the School of Urban and Public Affairs.

Required Core Courses

URPA 1301. INTRODUCTION TO URBAN LIFE (3-0) 3 hours credit. An examination of major urban problems, opportunities, and policy issues including crime, transportation, housing, education, welfare, and the environment with emphasis on racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity issues and alternative future possibilities; and an examination of the major political, social, and economic challenges facing contemporary urban planners and administrators - with emphasis on the interrelations among the national, state, and local governments.

URPA 3301. THE METROPLEX (3-0) 3 hours credit. An in-depth orientation to urban dynamics, using as a case study the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex - with its hundreds of cities, governmental units, neighborhoods, and business enterprises as well as its major concentrations of racial minorities and ethnic groups. Special attention is paid to the changing patterns of growth and demography occurring in the Dallas/Fort Worth metropolitan area and the impact of these on emerging social, political, and economic issues of this area. Emphasis also placed on career specializations and professional opportunities in the urban context.



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Public Administration Emphasis Area Support Courses

ACCT 3309. ACCOUNTING FOR MANAGERS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Planning, controlling, decision making, and performance evaluation. Uses a variety of teaching techniques (e.g., problems, cases, and projects) and is open only to non-accounting majors. Credit will not be given for both this course and ACCT 4302. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302 with a grade of C or higher.

ACCT 4325. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING (3-0) 3 hours credit. Budgeting, accounting, and financial reporting for local governmental units, hospitals, voluntary health and welfare organizations, and other nonprofit entities. Prerequisite: ACCT 3312.

ANTH 4348. POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-0) Relationships among power, identity, and culture in cross-cultural perspective. Traditional political systems, political symbols and rituals, gender and power, and the relationship between domination and resistance. How culture influences the ways in which men and women get power, use power, and resist power.

COMM 4305. COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Readings and analysis of the role of communication in modern society; its impact on contemporary social, cultural, political, and intellectual trends.

COMM 4330. POLITICAL COMMUNICATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. Communication theories, principles, and strategies in modern political campaigns and events.

COMM 4335 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3-0) Examination of verbal and nonverbal barriers to effective intercultural communication such as ethnocentrism, stereotyping, prejudice, racism, proxemics, kinesics, haptics, and chronemics. Developing effective communication in intercultural contexts. Prerequisite: COMM 2315 and 60 hours earned.

COMS 3309. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. Communication functions within formally structured social systems such as business, government, and education. Emphasis on conceptual schemes for conducting analysis of training programs in organizational communication. Prerequisite: six hours of speech.

COMS 3310 GROUP COMMUNICATION THEORY (3-0) Characteristics of group communication including group function and formation, norms, cohesion, problem solving, leadership, and ethics. Prerequisite: COMS (formerly SPCH) 2304.

COMS 3316. COMMUNICATION IN HUMAN RELATIONS (3-0) 3 hours credit. The human communication process within the social, business, and family context. Theories and principles of interpersonal communication and perception of self and others. Prerequisite: six hours of speech.

CRCJ 3336. LAW ENFORCEMENT MANAGEMENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines the principles of administration, management, politics and leadership with emphasis on their applicability to police planning, organization, direction, control, and personnel management.

CRCJ 4309 PRIVATE SECURITY ADMINISTRATION (3-0) The essentials of governmental and proprietary security development and program planning; including personnel recruitment and training, developing and conducting security audits, records and information protection, and general applications of modern management techniques to security organization. Prerequisite: CRCJ 3307.

ECON 3304. PUBLIC SECTOR ECONOMICS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines various economic reasons that may justify government involvement in the economy with particular focus on the problems inherent in government intervention. It considers topics such as the efficiency and fairness of alternative taxing systems, the growth and effects of government debt, and public choice (how spending and taxing decisions are made). It analyzes various government programs such as Social Security, health care, expenditure programs for the poor, etc. Prerequisite: ECON 2306 or consent of instructor.

ECON 3313 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND PUBLIC POLICY (3-0) Explains market structure and its relation to strategic behavior, advertising, pricing and product differentiation decisions. Further topics include the organization of the firm, takeovers, mergers and acquisitions, research and development, and the various regulatory controls placed on firms and industries. Prerequisite: ECON 2306.

ECON 3335. ECONOMICS OF PUBLIC POLICIES (3-0) 3 hours credit. Economic analysis of issues of general interest. A non-technical application of principles of economics to current topics such as abortion, crime, deficit spending, divorce, education, health care, immigration, politics, recycling, risk and safety, Social Security, sports, and tax policy. Prerequisite: ECON 2306 or consent of instructor.

ECON 4330 LABOR ECONOMICS (3-0) Application of economic principles to labor topics such as the demand for marriage, the demand for children, the economics of beauty, the economics of highly paid sports and entertainment stars, the effects of immigration on U.S. wages and employment, workplace discrimination, the effects of affirmative action policies, and the effects of minimum wage legislation. Prerequisite: ECON 2306.

MANA 2302. COMMUNICATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines contributions of the social and behavioral sciences to understand communications processes in organizations. Adopting both an interpersonal and organizational perspective, course topics include: verbal and nonverbal communications, dyadic and organizational communications, communication of roles and relationships, small-group communication, communication networks, and the diagnosis and improvement of organizational communications. MANA 2302 will satisfy the cultural and social studies requirement in the College of Business Administration.

MANA 3318. MANAGING ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3-0) 3 hours credit. This course is an introduction to the factors that influence individual and group behavior in organizations. Emphasizing findings from the field of organizational behavior, topics covered include: individual differences and diversity, social information processing, work attitudes, stress, work motivation, power and influence, negotiation, teams, leadership, and organizational research.

MANA 3319 MANAGEMENT PROCESS THEORY (3-0) Fundamentals of the management process; principles and techniques for all organizations. The basic functions of management: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. Social responsibilities, political influences, and ethical considerations as they affect the management of organizations. Coverage of international business, production, communications, and decision-making in terms of management activities.

MANA 3320. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. Process of effective management of human resources and those elements essential to such a process. The objectives of an adequate personnel program. Effective planning, recruitment, selection, training. Employee compensation and the nature of pay and its relative importance. The nature of union-management relationships. The impact of organized labor upon personnel management.

MANA 4325. LEADERSHIP IN ORGANIZATIONS (3-0) 3 hours credit. This is an upper-level, seminar-based course examining leadership theory and research, and emphasizing the development of leadership and interpersonal skills through self-assessment case analysis, and experiential exercises.

MANA 4326. DIVERSITY IN ORGANIZATIONS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines the implications of employee diversity in organizations, an issue of increasing importance. Includes study of the changing demographics of workers, effects of diversity on performance, teamwork, and cohesion, and ways of effectively managing in a diverse workplace. Legislation related to diversity is also reviewed.

MANA 4328. HUMAN RESOURCE STAFFING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. Covers the areas of employee selection and performance management systems. Topics include: recruitment strategies, methods of selection, development and validation of selection and employee appraisal instruments, and implementation of performance management processes.

MANA 4330 TEAM MANAGEMENT (3-0) This course examines the critical input, process and outcomes variables in the design of and maintenance of highly effective work teams. Topics include: team composition, team norms, team decision-making strategies, intra-team and inter-team conflict, team building, management of effective work teams, and team-based organizational structures. Prerequisite: MANA 3318.

MANA 4340. BUSINESS AND SOCIETY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Explores the roles of business organizations and their relationships with individuals, governments, and other businesses from the perspectives of ethics, ideology, and corporate responsibility.

MANA 4341. NEGOTIATIONS AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION (3-0) 3 hours credit. This course is designed to better understand the nature of conflict and its resolution through persuasion, collaboration, and negotiation. Students will learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. Students will assess their own styles, skills, and values, and develop techniques to better resolve disputes, achieve objectives, and exert influence. Prerequisite: MANA 3318.

PHIL 2312 ETHICS (3-0) An inquiry into the basic principles of the moral life through a critical examination of traditional and current theories of value, right and wrong, good and evil, happiness, duty, and freedom.

POLS 2312. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. The principles and organization of American state, county, and municipal government, together with current problems and the constitution and government of Texas.

POLS 3303. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. The scope and development of public administrative organizations; both the traditional and behavioral approaches to the treatment of administrative principles, decision making, and organizational environment.

POLS 3305. GOVERNMENT IN URBAN AMERICA (3-0) 3 hours credit. Governmental problems associated with the growth of urban areas and proposed solutions for Texas and elsewhere.

POLS 3307. STATE AND LOCAL POLITICS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Comparison of state and local political systems. State and local political components, philosophies, leaders, and issues. Prerequisites: POLS 2311 and 2312.

POLS 3308 POLITICS OF A TEXAS CITY: ARLINGTON CITY POLITICS (3-0) Describes the political processes over a period of fifty years from the immediate post-World War II years to the present. The outlines of Arlington city government, its structure, the changes, and personalities that have shaped it and held power. This course does not satisfy area distribution requirements.

POLS 4303. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND THE POLITICAL PROCESS (3-0) 3 hours credit. The relationships of public administration at all levels with democratic institutions, including its interactions in the formulation and execution of public policies with the chief executive, the legislative and judicial branches, political parties, clientele groups, and the public at large.

POLS 4331 U.S. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: GOVERNMENT POWER (3-0) U.S. Supreme Court decisions regarding the structure of government in the United States. Focus on Congress, the President, Federalism, and the relation of the judicial process to these topics. Recommended for pre-law majors.

POLS 4353. PUBLIC BUDGETING AND TAXATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. The concepts, processes, and policy impacts of taxation and public budgeting. Individual, group, and institutional roles in taxes and budgeting are emphasized. Introduction to current research techniques in political economy.

PSYC 3301 PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN RELATIONS (3-0) Workplace applications of topics including person perception, social influence, group processes and dynamics, interpersonal relations, teamwork, leadership, workplace discrimination, diversity, stress, and burnout.

PSYC 3302 BUSINESS PSYCHOLOGY (3-0) A survey of the fields of industrial and organizational psychology, focusing on the application of psychological theory to understanding and solving problems in the workplace. Topics include recruitment, employee selection and training, the effects of attitudes, motivation, group dynamics and leadership, job satisfaction, productivity and morale.

URPA 4391. CONFERENCE COURSE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Designed for undergraduate students pursuing a minor in urban affairs and public policy, or public administration or urban planning and the environment. Permission of the director of undergraduate studies is required.



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Urban Planning and the Environment Emphasis Area Support Courses

ARCH 3331 ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENT (3-0) An overview of sustainable design integrated with natural resource conservation. Prerequisite: ARCH 2552. Junior standing in program. Restricted to Architecture majors.

ARCH 4305 THE CITY OF ROME (3-0) History, topography, and monuments of the city of Rome and its environs from its legendary founding in 753 B.C. until the 20th Century. Urban form and architecture will be inspected in context of contemporaneous culture, with special emphasis on imperial and papal Rome. Prerequisite: Department consent. Restricted to Architecture and Interior Design Majors.

ARCH 4306. URBAN DESIGN THEORY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Design theory and its application to the urban scale, as applied to historical and contemporary examples. Prerequisite: junior standing.

ARCH 4308. HISTORY OF URBAN FORM (3-0) 3 hours credit. The history of cities as physical form, influenced by political, economic, and social forces.

ARCH 4309 THE CITY OF LONDON (3-0) History, topography, and monuments of Greater London from before the Roman colonization in the First Century until the 20th Century. Emphasis will be placed upon London's growth into a world capital since the Great Fire of 1666, stressing problems of transportation in 19th and 20th Centuries. Prerequisite: Department consent. Restricted to Architecture and Interior Design majors.

ARCH 4314 HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION (3-0) Concepts and implementation of the restoration and preservation of historic structures and places, including archaeological, bibliographic, legislative, institutional, and physical parameters to the retention and adaptive re-use of significant architecture. Prerequisite: ARCH 2303, ARCH 2304. Junior standing in program. Restricted to Architecture and Interior Design majors.

BLAW 3314. REAL ESTATE LAW (3-0) 3 hours credit. Development of real estate law and the legal constraints within which real estate decisions are made. Prerequisite: junior standing.

CIRP 4391. STUDIES IN CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING (3-0) 3 hours credit. Advanced studies in various subjects of city and regional planning. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

CE 3302. TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING (3-0) 3 hours credit. Planning, design, and operation of transportation facilities. Characteristics of vehicle movement; basic geometric design of highways; traffic flow relations in traffic streams and on transit lines; highway capacity; transit operation; traffic engineering; and legal requirements and procedures for transportation planning. Prerequisite: CE 2331; 2313 or concurrent registration therein; and CE 3301 or IE 3301 or concurrent registration therein.

CE 3334. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (3-0) 3 hours credit. Physical, chemical, and biological unit operations and processes in an air, water, and land environment. Prerequisite: CHEM 1442; CE 3305 or consent of instructor.

CE 4311 URBAN TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING (3-0) Urban transportation system design, planning, transportation modeling, economic theory, travel demand and travel estimation techniques. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3302.

CE 4313. TRAFFIC ENGINEERING (3-0) 3 hours credit. Design and control of fixed-time, actuated, and computer-controlled traffic signals; optimization of traffic flow at intersections; capacity analysis of intersections, legal requirements and traffic studies for installation of traffic control devices; characteristics of signs, signals, and markings; traffic laws. Prerequisite: CE 3302 or concurrent registration therein.

ECON 3328 PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORTATION (3-0) Impact of freight and passenger transport upon individual, business, and governmental decision-making in an evolving, competitive world economy. Prerequisite: ECON 2306.

ECON 4302 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (3-0) Economic forces that influence the quality of the environment; economic theory and environmental management; regulatory requirements for economic impact analysis; international issues including trade and implications for Third World economies. Prerequisite: ECON 2306.

GEOG 3350 READING THE LANDSCAPE (3-0) How historians and geographers identify and interpret clues in the landscape (such as place names, architecture, vegetation, transportation, field and street patterns) that reflect historical change and its social, economic, environmental and geographic consequences. Offered as GEOG 3350 and HIST 3350; credit will be granted only once.

GEOG 3355 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3-0) People and the natural environment from the colonial period to the present. Ecological change, conservation movements, and artistic and literary interpretations of landscape and nature. Listed as GEOG 3355 and HIST 3355; credit will be granted only once.

GEOL 1430. GLOBAL WARMING (3-1) Global environmental challenges confronting humanity such as pollution, depletion of natural resources, ecosystem deterioration, food production, and population growth

GEOL 2406 NATURAL RESOURCES & SUSTAINABILITY (3-2) Energy, construction, agricultural, and hydrological resources are evaluated in terms of their production and use, including storage and disposal of waste. Emphasis is placed on the importance of preserving clean water, air and soils. The course will concentrate on what humans take from the Earth, the impacts it has on their environment, and what it takes to make the planet sustainable for human habitation.

GEOL 4331. ANALYSIS OF SPATIAL DATA (2-1) 3 hours credit. Analyzing spatial data using ArcGIS, Spatial Analyst, and 3-D Analyst, topological surface analysis and modeling; 3-D visualization and viewscapes; spatial statistics and data quality management. Prerequisite: GEOL 4330, junior standing, or permission of instructor.

HIST 3350. READING THE LANDSCAPE (3-0) 3 hours credit. How historians and geographers identify and interpret clues in the landscape (such as place names, architecture, vegetation, transportation, field and street patterns) that reflect historical change and its social, economic, environmental, and geographic consequences. Also listed as GEOG 3350; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3355. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3-0) 3 hours credit. People and the natural environment from the colonial period to the present. Ecological change, conservation movements, and artistic and literary interpretations of landscape and nature. Also offered as GEOG 3335; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3362. CITIES AND SUBURBS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Traces urban and suburban development from the colonial era to the present with special emphasis not only on the transformation of their physical appearance over time but on their changing meaning and significance in American history. Focuses on the economic base of urban and suburban expansion, as well as the social, political, and cultural dynamics of metropolitan America.

POLS 2312. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. The principles and organization of American state, county and municipal government, together with current problems and the constitution and government of Texas.

POLS 4351. ENERGY POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. Basic issues underlying the politics, economics, and administration of energy policy within the United States. Emerging energy sources, such as solar and geothermal. Prerequisites: POLS 2311 and 2312.

PSYC 3316. ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-0) 3 hours credit. The effect of the social, physical, and ecological features of the environment. Social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Prerequisite: PSYC 1315.

REAE 3325. REAL ESTATE FUNDAMENTALS (3-0) 3 hours credit. A foundation for study and research in specialized areas such as real estate financing, real estate investment and counseling, real estate management, real estate development, and property appraising. Prerequisite: MATH 1316 (or permission of instructor), and junior standing.

REAE 4314. REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. The land conversion process including feasibility analysis, site selection, design, construction, and financial analysis. Land use controls, planning, and environmental constraints are also examined. Prerequisite: junior standing.

SOCI 3336. SOCIAL INEQUALITY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines the processes, characteristics, and consequences of social inequality in society. Topics include the social class structure, status groups, and elite power structure as they influence people's life chances.

SOCI 3353. SOCIAL CLIMATE OF CITIES (2-2) 3 hours credit. A comparative study of urban communities and metropolitan areas in terms of their distinctive social life and culture. Topics touching on power and urban politics, race and ethnic relations, poverty, and leisure and lifestyles will be examined in terms of their contribution to the unique social climate of cities.



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Urban Affairs and Public Policy Emphasis Area support courses

ANTH 2322 GLOBAL CULTURES (3-0) Methods and theories of sociocultural anthropology. Examines systems of social organization and cultural meaning in contemporary human societies. Topics include fieldwork, cross-cultural analysis, applied anthropology, and global perspectives on political, economic, and social institutions. Formerly ANTH 3322; credit will not be granted for both ANTH 2322 and 3322.

ANTH 3339 URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY (3-0) Examines main issues, theoretical approaches and ethnographic methods used by anthropologists working in cities. Also discusses relevant contemporary topics such as growth of global cities, gentrification, poverty and inequality, and the economic, social and cultural integration of international immigrants in U.S. cities.

ANTH 3355 THE RISE OF CIVILIZATION (3-0) The development of complex cultures from village farming societies in various regions of the Old and New Worlds. The civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Mesoamerica, among others, will be treated, along with general questions concerning the rise, development, and collapse of early civilizations. Formerly ANTH 2355; credit will not be granted for both ANTH 2355 and 3355.

COMM 4305. COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Readings and analysis of the role of communication in modern society; its impact on contemporary social, cultural, political, and intellectual trends.

COMM 4330. POLITICAL COMMUNICATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. Communication theories, principles, and strategies in modern political campaigns and events.

COMM 4335. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examination of verbal and nonverbal barriers to effective intercultural communication such as ethnocentrism, stereotyping, prejudice, racism, proxemics, kinesics, haptics, and chronemics. Developing effective communication in intercultural contexts.

COMS 3310. GROUP COMMUNICATION THEORY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Characteristics of group communication including group function and formation, norms, cohesion, problem solving, leadership, and ethics. Prerequisite: COMS (formerly SPCH) 2304.

COMS 3316. COMMUNICATION IN HUMAN RELATIONS (3-0) 3 hours credit. The human communication process within the social, business, and family context. Theories and principles of interpersonal communication and perception of self and others. Prerequisite: six hours of speech.

CRCJ 3380. RACE, CRIME, AND JUSTICE (3-0) 3 hours credit. An overview of ethnic and gender issues focusing on victims, offenders, and professionals in the criminal justice system.

CRCJ 4301. THE AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM (3-0) 3 hours credit. Federal, state, and local judicial systems, with special emphasis on state trial courts having criminal jurisdiction. Court structure and function, court management, and judicial behavior.

CRCJ 4325 GANGS (3-0) An examination of historical and contemporary street and correctional institutional gangs. Addresses the nature and definition of gangs, types and diversity of membership of gangs, theoretical explanations, criminal and deviant behavior, law enforcement responses, intervention and prevention strategies, and public policy issues. Prerequisite: CRCJ 2334.

ECON 2337. ECONOMICS OF SOCIAL ISSUES (3-0) 3 hours credit. Economic consequences and solutions of current social issues. Each semester, a series of topics will be covered in line with current events and the instructor's expertise to facilitate an understanding of the economic structure.

ECON 3302. THE ECONOMICS OF CRIME (3-0) 3 hours credit. Economic analysis of criminal activity and its impact on the allocation of scarce resources; economic models of criminal behavior, optimum allocation of criminal justice resources, public and private sector approaches to deterrence, and current issues such as gun control and drug abuse prevention. Prerequisite: ECON 2306 or consent of instructor.

ECON 3335. ECONOMICS OF PUBLIC POLICIES (3-0) 3 hours credit. Economic analysis of issues of general interest. A non-technical application of principles of economics to current topics such as abortion, crime, deficit spending, divorce, education, health care, immigration, politics, recycling, risk and safety, social security, sports, and tax policy. Prerequisite: ECON 2306 or consent of instructor.

ECON 4330. LABOR ECONOMICS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Application of economic principles to labor topics such as the demand for marriage, the demand for children, the economics of beauty, the economics of highly paid sports and entertainment stars, the effects of immigration on U.S. wages and employment, workplace discrimination, the effects of affirmative action policies, and the effects of minimum wage legislation. Prerequisite: ECON 2306.

GEOG 3350 READING THE LANDSCAPE (3-0) How historians and geographers identify and interpret clues in the landscape (such as place names, architecture, vegetation, transportation, field and street patterns) that reflect historical change and its social, economic, environmental and geographic consequences. Offered as GEOG 3350 and HIST 3350; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 2301. HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. Significant developments from prehistoric times through the 16th century. Achievements and experiences of great civilizations, emphasizing major historical figures and epochs, important ideas and religions, and factors of continuity and change. Provides a foundation for understanding our heritage and shared values, and introduces students to the historical forces that have shaped today's world.

HIST 2302 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION (3-0) (HIST 2312). Major modern trends such as industrialism, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, and the more complex problems and conflicts of the present century. Particular attention to the emergence of a global civilization. Provides a foundation for understanding our heritage and shared values, and introduces students to the historical forces that have shaped today's world.

HIST 3350 READING THE LANDSCAPE (3-0) How historians and geographers identify and interpret clues in the landscape (such as place names, architecture, vegetation, transportation, field and street patterns) that reflect historical change and its social, economic, environmental and geographic consequences. Offered as GEOG 3350 and HIST 3350; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3351. HISTORY OF THE DALLAS-FORT WORTH METROPLEX (3-0) 3 hours credit. The growth and development of Dallas and Fort Worth from competitive 19th-century trade centers in a rural setting to cooperative high-tech cities in a rapidly urbanizing metroplex. Political, economic, cultural, and spatial changes of this area are explored within a national urban context.

HIST 3362. CITIES AND SUBURBS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Traces urban and suburban development from the colonial era to the present with special emphasis not only on the transformation of their physical appearance over time but on their changing meaning and significance in American history. Focuses on the economic base of urban and suburban expansion, as well as the social, political, and cultural dynamics of metropolitan America.

HIST 3366. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1865-PRESENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. Emphasis on the transition from slavery to freedom, the political, social, and economic status of blacks in the late 19th century, 20th century black institutions and culture, and the evolution of the civil rights movement.

HIST 3368. THE HISTORY OF THE MEXICAN AMERICAN (3-0) 3 hours credit. The role of the Mexican American in the cultural and historical development of the United States with special emphasis on the Southwest.

HIST 3373 U.S. ECONOMIC HISTORY, 1860-PRESENT (3-0) Rise of manufacturing, marketing, and electrification. Organized labor and rebellions against the corporate world. Government regulation of business and labor. Corporations and unions during depressions and wars. Auto, high tech, and other industries. The military-industrial complex. Franchising and other trends.

HUMA 4302. SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THEORY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examination of the major social and political theories that have shaped Western thought. Topics may include the concept of the social, the role of the individual, the public/private distinction, and gender relations. Focus on particular theorists as well as issues.

INTS 4388. SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (3-0) Justice, Democracy, and Metropolitan Environments. This course considers the relationship of justice, equity, and environmental protection in American metropolitan areas. Students will use interdisciplinary approaches to frame questions about how environmental issues could prompt the modification of social, economic, and political practices to promote better relations between human beings and their whole environment. Prerequisite INTS 2301 and INTS 4301 with a grade of C or better, or ESST 2300. [INTS 4388 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENTAL RELATED.]

MANA 4326. DIVERSITY IN ORGANIZATIONS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines the implications of employee diversity in organizations, an issue of increasing importance. Includes study of the changing demographics of workers, effects of diversity on performance, teamwork, and cohesion, and ways of effectively managing in a diverse workplace. Legislation related to diversity is also reviewed.

MANA 4340 BUSINESS AND SOCIETY (3-0) Explores the roles of business organizations and their relationships with individuals, governments, and other businesses from the perspectives of ethics, ideology, and corporate responsibility.

MANA 4341. NEGOTIATIONS AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION. (3-0) 3 hours credit. This course is designed to better understand the nature of conflict and its resolution through persuasion, collaboration, and negotiation. Students will learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. Students will assess their own styles, skills, and values, and develop techniques to better resolve disputes, achieve objectives, and exert influence. Prerequisite: MANA 3318.

POLS 2312. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. The principles and organization of American state, county, and municipal government, together with current problems and the constitution and government of Texas.

POLS 3305. GOVERNMENT IN URBAN AMERICA (3-0) 3 hours credit. Governmental problems associated with the growth of urban areas and proposed solutions for Texas and elsewhere.

POLS 3308 POLITICS OF A TEXAS CITY: ARLINGTON CITY POLITICS (3-0) Describes the political processes over a period of fifty years from the immediate post-World War II years to the present. The outlines of Arlington city government, its structure, the changes, and personalities that have shaped it and held power. This course does not satisfy area distribution requirements.

POLS 3312. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS (3-0) 3 hours credit. The American policymaking process from issue creation to program administration and evaluation. Policy models and methods of policy analysis. Oriented toward providing students with skills as a professional policy analyst.

POLS 3313 MODERN CRITICS OF SOCIETY AND POLITICS (3-0) Designed for both political science and other majors. Focus on writers like Banfield, Galbraith, Marcuse, Reich, Revel, Skinner, and Toffler.

POLS 4317. ETHNIC GROUP POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES (3-0) 3 hours credit. The influence of selected major ethnic groups with special attention given to organizational development, participation in political parties, leadership, ideology, immigration policy, current issues, and relations with the dominant culture and other ethnic groups.

POLS 4318. POLITICS OF AFRICAN AMERICANS (3-0) 3 hours credit. The influence of African American politics on United States government and policies with special attention given to organizational development, participation in political parties, leadership, ideology, the Civil Rights movement, current issues, and relations with other ethnic groups.

POLS 4319. POLITICS OF MEXICAN AMERICANS (3-0) 3 hours credit. The influence of Mexican American politics on United States government and policies with special attention given to organizational development, participation in political parties, leadership, ideology, the Chicano movement, current issues, and relationships with other ethnic groups.

POLS 4352. U.S. IMMIGRATION POLICY AND THE AMERICAN DREAM (3-0) 3 hours credit. Focus on American identity through the examination of immigration to the United States, past and present, and the evolution of U.S. immigration policy. Topics include U.S. attitudes and policy responses to European, Asian, and Latin American immigration and to the incorporation of the descendants of African slaves and Native Americans.

PSYC 3315 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-0) The theories and research dealing with individual behavior in the social environment. Social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. PSYC 3144 is an optional laboratory which, when added to PSYC 3315, satisfies a portion of the laboratory requirement.

SOCW 3301 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I (3-0) The first of two required human behavior courses that explore, within the context of a strengths and empowerment perspective, knowledge of the bio-psycho-social development of persons from birth through young adulthood.

SOCW 3303. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY AND SERVICES (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines how social goals are met by social welfare institutions. Conceptual schemes are developed for analyzing the structure of social welfare institutions and evaluating social welfare sub-systems. The social work profession is also examined in the context of the evolution and function of the contemporary American social welfare system. Prerequisite: SOCW 2311.

SOCW 3317. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND DIVERSE POPULATIONS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Introduction to theoretical, practical, and policy issues related to diverse populations. Historical, political, and socioeconomic forces are examined that maintain discriminatory and oppressive values, attitudes, and behaviors in society and in all levels of organizational behavior. Prerequisite: SOCW 2311, 2313.

SOCI 3317 INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY (3-0) How society influences individual thought, feeling, and behavior. Includes interpersonal perception, attitudes, norms, roles, conformity, and such social issues as aggression, helping behavior, prejudice, and interpersonal attraction.

SOCI 3324 SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (3-0) Focuses on twentieth and twenty-first century social movements, including the U.S. civil rights movement, the student and anti-war movements of the 1960s, the women's movement, the environmental movement, and anti-globalization movements. Status politics movements, such as pro-choice/pro-life and gay rights movements, are also explored. Compares these movements with their counterparts in other countries and identifies the reasons for their successes and failures. Prerequisite: SOCI 1311.

SOCI 3327 INTERCULTURAL INTERACTION (3-0) Patterns and variations in interactions involving people from different cultures and subcultures. Intercultural interaction, both within multicultural societies and between persons from different societies.

SOCI 3336. SOCIAL INEQUALITY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines the processes, characteristics, and consequences of social inequality in society. Topics include the social class structure, status groups, and elite power structure as they influence people's life chances.

SOCI 3353. SOCIAL CLIMATE OF CITIES (2-2) 3 hours credit. A comparative study of urban communities and metropolitan areas in terms of their distinctive social life and culture. Topics touching on power and urban politics, race and ethnic relations, poverty, and leisure and lifestyles will be examined in terms of their contribution to the unique social climate of cities.

SOCI 3357 LAW AND SOCIETY (3-0) Law as a social institution. The processes of defining criminal conduct and the social functions of law and of legal processes and systems. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

SOCI 4315 VIOLENCE IN SOCIETY (3-0) Violence as a group process directed toward social change. Historical perspectives, current events, preventive and control techniques, public reaction, and individual behavior. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

URPA 4391. CONFERENCE COURSE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Designed for undergraduate students pursuing a minor in urban affairs and public policy, or public administration or urban planning and the environment. Permission of the director of undergraduate studies is required.

 



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Minor Program in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ESST)

The study of the environment and sustainability is fundamentally an interdisciplinary or cross-disciplinary enterprise that requires innovative connections among academic fields. The minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies enables students to utilize the many courses on sustainability and the environment offered throughout the university while developing a systematic and cohesive understanding of sustainability and the environment.

With the permission of their departmental advisor and after consulting with a specified undergraduate advisor within the School of Urban and Public Affairs (SUPA), students enroll in 18 hours selected from the courses listed below (and others upon approval). Students are required to take one core course, ESST 2300: Introduction to Environmental Studies, which introduces students to problems, theories, and methods relating to sustainability and the environmnet using an interdisciplinary approach. This course should be taken as early as possible. At least one course must be taken in each of the three groups listed (Architecture and Urban and Public Affairs; Liberal Arts, Social and Cultural Studies; Natural Sciences and Engineering). At least 6 hours must be taken as 3000- or 4000-level courses.

Some of the following courses change content from offering to offering and might not be relevant to the minor during a particular semester. For most such courses, special topics focusing on the environment and/or sustainability are offered at least once in a two-year cycle. Credit toward the minor will be given only when the topic of the course focuses on the environment and/or sustainability. In addition, special topics courses and/or other courses not on this list may also be used to fulfill the requirements of the minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies minor with the permission of the program's advisor. For these reason it is important that students consult with the SUPA undergraduate advisor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies before registering each semester.

Core Course

ESST 2300. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (3-0) Introduces major problems, questions, issues, and methods within interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary environmental studies. Includes a study of some of the most significant texts, studies, practices, and creative works from at least four different fields as they pertain to questions of environment, ecology, and sustainability. Features guest lectures by faculty teaching courses within the Environmental & Sustainability Studies minor.

Liberal Arts, Social and Cultural Studies Group

ANTH 3325. ETHNOGRAPHY OF SOUTH AMERICA (3-0) The indigenous groups of South America, with emphasis on the Aymara and Quechua of the Andes. Topics include culture change, environmental destruction, and preservation of cultural heritage.

ART 3357. SUSTAINABLE DESIGN (2-4) An overview of critical environmental issues that affect the contemporary practice of visual communication. Emphasis on ethics, environmental and society responsibility, and creative visual problem solving. Course may include, but is not limited to, lecture, discussion, reading, and creative design exploration. Prerequisite: ART 2354 or the permission of the advisor.

ENGL 1301. CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING I (3-0) Expository Writing and the Environment With a particular focus on the environment, this course follows a traditional English 1301 curriculum, stressing critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. The course examines how the human and non-human worlds interact, and how humans represent, interpret, and approach the non human world. Students read a variety of texts ranging from foundationally important canonical works by Henry David Thoreau and John Muir to contemporary theoretical works by William Cronon and Giovanna Di Chiro. Students also engage with critical ideas about the environment through class discussions and writing assignments. The goal of the course-in addition to developing critical reading, writing, and thinking skills---is to challenge students' conceptions of the environment, encourage them to consider how they are always interacting with the environment, encourage them to consider how they are always interacting with the environment and the importance of these interactions in a world faced with depleting resources that require increasing programs that promote sustainability. [ENGL 1301 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENT-RELATED]

ENGL 1301. CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING II (3-0) Writing Argument, Thinking Green English 1302 is an integrated course in critical thinking, reading, and writing. Because these three processes are mutually dependent, we will spend our time in the course reading and analyzing environmental texts, as well as writing them. The type of formal writing we will do in this class is generally known as argumentative writing, or rhetoric. I n this type of writing, you will show both your understanding of argument structure, of environmental texts we read, and your own thoughts about issues they discuss. Furthermore, insofar as the theme of the course is environment and sustainability, you will be encouraged to engage with this subject in multiple ways through argumentative writing and presentation as well as through your daily practice. [ENGL 1302 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENTAL-RELATED]

ENGL 2303. TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT (3-0) This course will discuss the relation between literature and environment, investigating the many representations of environment, nature, and animals, in literature, film, theory, and popular culture texts. [ ENGL 2303 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENT-RELATED.]

ENGL 3347. TOPICS IN MULTICULTURAL LITERATURES (3-0) Power and Place. Environmentalism and environmental justice in multicultural literatures, history, and theory. [ENGL 3347 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENT RELATED.]

ENGL 3366. TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT (3-0) Contemporary Environmental Literature. This course discusses a wide range of texts including--novels, science fictions, a 21st century Western, Native American literature, poetry, nature writing, memoirs, theory, and science writing-- all of which grapple with different issues concerning the human relationship to nature, environment, and animals. Topics will include encountering nature, evaluating the ideals of the wilderness and the wild, tracking power through natural-cultural places, surviving risky environments, the politics of food, global warming and other dystopias, and animal studies. Students have the option of a research paper, service-learning, or a work of multimedia for their final project. [ENGL 3366 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENTAL-RELATED]

ENGL 4350. TOPICS IN FILM AND LITERATURE (3-0) Nature and Environment in Film and Theory. This course will examine a wide range of films and introduce significant ideas, concepts, and questions within ecocriticism, green and cultural studies, environmental studies, and animal studies. The course will discuss the environmental, ethical, political, and philosophical ramifications of the way the films represent nature, animals, and humans. The course includes a focus on how activist and documentary films represent science. [ ENGL 4305 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENTAL-RELATED].

HIST 3355. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3-0) People and the natural environment from the colonial period to the present. Ecological change, conservation movements, and artistic and literary interpretations of landscape and nature. Also listed as GEOG 3355; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 4388. TOPICS IN HISTORY: ISSUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY (3-0) (Specific title may vary with course theme and content). This class will take an issue or set of issues of present-day concern, such as global climate change, energy use, water rights and resources, food production and consumption or else a broadly defined theme, such as environment and economic development, environment and colonization, or environment and poverty, and trace those issues and/or themes through history. The class may beak a broadly comparative and global perspective, or it may have a specific geographical focus, for example, on Latin America, the Mediterranean, South Asia, or the Caribbean. [HIST 4388 WIL LBE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENT-RELATED.]

PHIL 3324. TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS (3-0) Investigation of a single moral issue or a cluster of issues that arise in the context of a particular profession. Examples of the former are abortion, punishment, freedom of speech, the environment, and the moral status of animals. Examples of the latter are business ethics, legal ethics, engineering ethics, nursing ethics, and computer ethics. May be repeated for credit as content changes. [PHIL 3324 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS.]

SOCI 3324. SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (3-0) Focuses on twentieth and twenty-first century social movements, including the U.S. civil rights movement, the student and antiwar movements of the 1960s, the women's movement, the environmental movement, and anti-globalization movements. Status politics movements, such as pro-choice/pro-life and gay rights movements, are also explored. Compares these movements with their counterparts in other countries and identifies the reasons for their successes and failures. Prerequisite: SOCI 1311. [SOCI3324 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS THE ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENT.]

Natural Sciences and Engineering Group

BIOL 2343. EVOLUTION & ECOLOGY (3-0) Reviews significant aspects of organismal biology and presents current hypotheses concerning the origin and diversification of life on earth. The ecological and behavioral interactions between organisms and their biotic/abiotic environments are considered from an evolutionary perspective. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441.

BIOL 3356. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS (3-0) Biological components of environmental systems. Population dynamics, species interactions, community structure, biodiversity, bioenergetics, nutrient cycling and human impacts are reviewed. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441,1442,2343.

BIOL 3357. MARINE BIOLOGY (3-0) Principle of oceanographic and ocean circulation, adaptations of marine organisms to their environment, ecological principles of marine biology and human impacts on the sea. Prerequisites: BIOL 1441, 1442.

CHEM 1445. CHEMISTRY FOR NON-SCIENCE MAJORS (3-3) Chemistry of things of everyday life: energy, radioactivity, petroleum products, pollution, the nature of matter, and the applications of chemistry to things we use. CHEM 1445, 1446 cannot be used to fulfill the 1441/1442 requirement in any degree program.

CHEM 1446. CHEMISTRY II FOR NON-SCIENCE MAJORS (3-3) Continuation of the chemistry of things of everyday life. Vitamins, minerals, chemical additives, plastics, cosmetics, proteins, carbohydrates, poisons, fats, and oils. Prerequisite: CHEM 1445 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. CHEM 1445, 1446 cannot be used to fulfill the 1441/1442 requirement in any degree program.

GEOL 1430. GLOBAL WARMING (3-1) Global environmental challenges confronting humanity such as pollution, depletion of natural resources, ecosystem deterioration, food production, and population growth.

GEOL 1450. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (3-1) The study of ocean basins and their origin, ocean currents, waves and tides, properties of sea water, and marine ecosystems, emphasizing the role of the ocean in the Earth system. Discussion of weekly ocean news, and incorporation of web-delivered current oceanographic data into the course material. Formerly offered as GEOL 3301 and GEOL 3184 and GEOL 2412; credit will be granted only once.

GEOL 2401. WEATHER & CLIMATE (3-3) Processes that control weather and climate. Methods of describing and forecasting weather. Predicting severe weather, tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods. Offered as GEOG 2401 and GEOL 2401; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite GEOL 1425.

GEOL 2414. THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN HEALTH (3-1) This course will assess the impact on human health of population growth and available resources; exposure to man-made harmful substances; and environmental degradation. Prerequisite: GEOL 1425.

GEOL 2406. NATURAL RESOURCES & SUSTAINABILITY Energy, construction, agricultural, and hydrological resources are evaluated in terms of their production and use, including storage and disposal of waste. Emphasis is placed on the importance of preserving clean water, air and soils. The course will concentrate on what humans take from the Earth, the impacts it has on their environment, and what it takes to make the planet sustainable for human habitation.

PSYC 3316. ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-0) The effect of the social, physical, and ecological features of the environment on human behavior. The effects of crowding, noise, architecture, urban design, and climate. Prerequisite: PSYC 1315.

Architecture and Urban and Public Affairs Group

ARCH 3331. ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENT (3-0) An overview of sustainable design integrated with natural resource conservation. Prerequisite: ARCH 2522 and Declared in Architecture or consent of department.

ARCH 4395. SELECTED TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE (3-0) Sustainability for Everyone This course is specifically designed for students from all units of the university. It examines the major issues of sustainability within four broad areas: economic, environmental, philosophical, and social. Readings are taken from a wide variety of recent studies, and the course is a discussion-based seminar that focuses upon the readings. [ARCH 4395 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENTAL-RELATED]

INTS 4388. SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (3-0) Justice, Democracy, and Metropolitan Environments This course considers the relationship of justice, equity, and environmental protection in American metropolitan areas. Students will use interdisciplinary approaches to frame questions about how environmental issues could prompt the modification of social, economic, and political practices to promote better relations between human beings and their whole environment. [INTS 4388 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENTAL RELATED.]

INTS 4388. SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (3-0) Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental & Sustainability Studies This course enables students to approach complex problems in environmental studies through the development of integrative skills. Utilizing both individual and group work, research will be applied toward a final project and /or policy statement. [INTS 4388 WILL BE APPROVED ONLY WHEN THE TOPIC IS ENVIRONMENT RELATED]

URPA 4305. FOUNDATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND SUSTAINABILITY (3-0) The organization, structure and practice of environmental protection at the federal, state and local levels of government. Course will develop a full understanding of how the goals of protecting human health and the environment are achieved through the implementation of environmental law, policy, practice, enforcement and collaboration among governmental entities, industry, environmental groups and the general public. Wide ranging use of case studies will be made and full engagement in new developments in the era of climate change will be achieved.

ADDITIONAL COURSES

Many departments also offer special topics courses on topics pertaining to the environment or sustainability. The Honors College and Interdisciplinary Studies, in particular, offer several special topics courses, some of which focus on the environment or sustainability. Such courses will need to be approved, semester by semester, to be eligible for inclusion within the minor.



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